The College of Forestry’s world-class students and faculty conduct ground-breaking research within the subjects of forestry, natural resources, tourism and wood science and engineering. Our research happens in labs and outdoors– on public and private lands across the state and in the College’s own 15,000 acres of College Research Forests as well as around the nation and the world.

The College of Forestry received $8.5 million in new and continuing awards.

Industry and agency partnerships thrived via the college’s 10 research cooperatives, with more than 100 private industry and government agency members providing an additional $1.5 million to support collaborative research.

Here are some examples of funded research projects from a portfolio of over 40 new projects:

Resistance or Resilience in Soil Carbon Pools?: Exploring Soil Carbon Dynamics Using a Ubiquitous Forest Organic Matter Removal Experiment
Sponsor: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Principal Investigator Jeffrey Hatten
$485,800

Collaborative Research: MSB-ENSA: Leveraging NEON to Build a Predictive Cross-scale Theory of Ecosystem Transpiration
Sponsor: National Science Foundation
Co-Principal Investigator Christopher Still
$473,045

Demonstrating Use and Performance of a CLT Modular Building Utilizing Low-Value Ponderosa Pine Lumber from Logs Harvested in Pacific NW Forest Restoration Programs
Sponsor: USDA Forest Service
Principal Investigator Mariapaola Riggio
$249,999

Fire Performance of Custom CLT Layups Utilizing Ponderosa Pine from Logs Harvested in Western Forest Restoration Programs
Sponsor: USDA Forest Service
Principal Investigator Rakesh Gupta
$249,998

Multi-Scale Assessment of Wildfire Impacts to Human and Ecological Values to Support Forest Service Fire Management Policy
Sponsor: USDA Forest Service
Principal Investigator Meg Krawchuk
$294,000

Scaling Juniper Markets:  Sustainable Solutions for Healthy Rangelands and Rural Opportunity
Sponsor: Sustainable Northwest/Oregon Innovation Council
Principal Investigator Scott Leavengood
$244,741

Earning an advanced degree
The Oregon State College of Forestry enjoys a century-long reputation as a leader in forestry research, teaching and extended education. Currently the college has more than 200 graduate students, including 35 international students from all over the world. The college offers graduate degrees in four distinct areas administered by three separate departments. About 75 faculty members teach at the graduate level, and the college employs more than 300 faculty, staff and support personnel.

Graduate degrees offered include Master of Forestry (MF), Master of Science (MS), Master of Natural Resources (MNR) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

FOREST ECOSYSTEMS + SOCIETY – MF,  MS,  PH.D.
The forest ecosystems and society graduate program develops interdisciplinary thinkers, highly capable scientists and natural resource leaders who are prepared to solve complex problems wherever they exist on the socioecological spectrum.

Students in this program learn to identify and contribute to collaborative solutions in ecology and natural resources-related social science. Students are not limited by mandated curriculum or required study tracks. Instead, faculty and professionals work with students to create their own course lists, program objectives and research projects, allowing students to focus on the skills and knowledge most relevant to their interests.

Students may earn an MF, MS or Ph.D. as they build the skills and knowledge needed for a fascinating career in research, teaching, management policy or outreach.

MASTER OF NATURAL RESOURCES – MNR
The master of natural resources graduate program is an interdisciplinary program designed for natural resources professionals. The 45-credit program is taught entirely online through the nationally-acclaimed OSU Ecampus. The program is offered as a nonthesis option only, similar to the Master of Business Administration (MBA) or MF.

Students in the program develop analytical and problem-solving skills needed to provide workable solutions for complex natural resources challenges and learn how to balance competing economic, health and environmental interests.

Graduates of this program enjoy virtually unlimited career opportunities in natural resources management, ranging from GIS experts and water conflict managers to wildlife habitat specialists and environmental policy analysts.

SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT – MF,  MS,  PH.D.
The sustainable forest management graduate program emphasizes the conservation of forest-dominated landscapes to meet ecological, economic and social criteria over long time frames through active forest management.

Students in this program may earn an MF,  MS or Ph.D., and can specialize in one of six areas of concentration: forest operations planning and management; forest policy analysis and economics; forest biometrics and geomatics; silviculture, fire and forest health; forest soil and watershed processes; or engineering for sustainable forestry.

The sustainable forest management graduate program provide graduates with the foundation for excellent career opportunities throughout industry, higher education, government and nonprofits.

WOOD SCIENCE – MS,  PH.D.
The Department of Wood Science and Engineering at the Oregon State College of Forestry offers a graduate education fully engaged in the dynamism and diversity of a rapidly evolving international field. Its wood science graduate program is fundamentally collaborative in nature and offers MS and Ph.D. degrees in a wide range of specialties, from chemistry to business.

Dual graduate degrees are encouraged. Common partner disciplines include civil engineering, mechanical engineering, materials science or forest science.

The demand for energy and thousands of consumer and industrial products made from wood and other renewable materials continues to grow as society becomes more aware of sustainability and green issues. The wood science program provides the foundation for great careers.

GRADUATING OUR FUTURE LEADERS
Educating the future research, teaching and outreach leaders in forest landscapes and ecosystems, the college awarded 102 graduate degrees in FY 2017 and FY 2018.

PARTNERSHIP IDENTIFIES TALENTED GRADUATE STUDENT CANDIDATES
In December 2017, an initiative for recruitment of Native Americans for the college’s graduate forestry programs was developed, funded partially by the department with a supplemental Graduate Laurels Block Grant. A committee including Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Intertribal Timber Council, the USDA Forest Service, and Salish-Kootenai College assisted in identifying potential graduate student candidates. Four Native American students were selected for admission in Fall 2018 and offered these tuition support awards. These students represent 23 percent of the fall 2018 class of forestry graduate program students.

FELLOWSHIPS PROVIDE AFFORDABLE OPPORTUNITIES
• The Dean’s Investment Fund funded two $30,000 matches to the Provost’s Distinguished Doctoral Fellowship, awarded in FY 2017 and FY 2018. The college also awarded more than $200,000 in graduate fellowships in FY 2017 and FY 2018, with a portion of funds coming from the Dean’s Investment Fund.
• With the goal of recruiting and retaining graduate students based on diversity and/or academic merit, the college awarded and administered $140,000 in tuition scholarship funding as part of the Graduate Laurels Block Grant from the OSU Graduate School.

SHARING GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH
Organized by graduate students, the college hosted the fifth and sixth annual Western Forestry Graduate Research Symposium. The symposium showcases current graduate student research and promotes academic excellence by challenging students to present their work and receive feedback from their academic and professional peers. In 2017 and 2018, the symposium showcased more than 80 combined poster and oral presentations.

Breeka Li Goodlander spent her childhood traversing the St. Croix River Valley in Minnesota on the way to her grandparents’ house. Cut from glaciers, the placid river is surrounded by oaks and maples, and Goodlander found its beauty fascinating.

In high school, she began to explore the idea of turning her love for the natural world into a career. During an AP environmental science class, she earned college credit taking soil and water samples near her high school.

Goodlander decided to attend the University of Minnesota, but was more excited about her internship for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, which allowed her to further explore her love of the environment.

Looking for a better option

“After two years, I had the opportunity to work full time for the state, so I started looking for more flexible learning opportunities,” Goodlander says.

She found Oregon State’s Ecampus on a list of top distance learning programs. OSU Ecampus is consistently ranked in the top 10 in the nation by U.S. News and World Report.

“I sent a random email to an advisor, and I was really impressed with how welcoming and prompt she was in responding to me even though I wasn’t a student yet,” Goodlander says. “The advisor answered all of my questions about transferring and doing a degree completely online. If not for her, I might not have applied to Oregon State.”

Goodlander found her student experience “liberating,” thanks to the flexibility. She says connecting with her professors was easy, and she fit her studies into her schedule during lunch breaks and after work.

“My favorite class was restoration ecology because we got to come up with a practical plan,” Goodlander says. “It was the first assignment I ever earned 100 percent on. It gave me the confidence to keep working hard.”

“Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never work a day in your life.”

Mark Twain’s quote rings true for Goodlander in her new position as a natural resources scientist for Pinnacle Engineering, Inc. She applies what she learned at Oregon State and spends her days exploring wetlands and writing reports about her observations.

“For example, I might be on site and notice a certain area is in the path of a butterfly migration, so it needs to be noted so that planned construction in the area doesn’t interfere,” Goodlander says. “I feel like I’m really making a difference. The people I work with are very like-minded, and it’s a field I really enjoy.”

She says that during the hiring process for her current position, her employers were impressed with the experience she was able to gain while in school.

“My position required three to four years of experience, and without Ecampus, I wouldn’t meet that requirement,” Goodlander says.

“I also made so many professional contacts while I was going to school and working that I wouldn’t have made otherwise.”

What’s Next

Goodlander’s employer is supportive of her completing graduate work, and there are several Oregon State options she’s interested in.

“Right now, I’m working on a certificate in wildlife management, and I hope to apply that to either a master of science or a master of natural resources degree.”

For now, she recommends OSU Ecampus to anyone looking for a flexible educational experience. Goodlander says her ultimate goal is to own her own wetland area.

“I would love to have my own space and open a wildlife rehabilitation facility,” she says. “I’ve always found the natural world very grounding. To me, it is what is real. It gives me inner peace.”

The Oregon State College of Forestry offers six distinct and top-ranked academic programs in a small, friendly environment where students get personal attention and guidance from faculty, staff and advisors.

Career paths take students into a forest, a factory, a laboratory or an office, and graduates leave Oregon State with knowledge and skills that are in demand in both the Pacific Northwest and worldwide.

All programs lead to a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree and allow students to focus on a particular forest landscape or ecosystem area.

FORESTRY
Oregon State is world-renowned for forestry education and research. In this program, students train outside, in forests and with real, cutting-edge technology and equipment. Students graduate with real-world experience, ready to actively plan for, observe and manage the health of the entire forest ecosystem. Graduates often go on to gain employment with either federal or state agencies or private timber companies.

The forestry program offers three options for students to focus on: forest restoration and fire, forest management and forest operations.

FOREST ENGINEERING
Oregon State offers the nation’s only ABET-accredited program in forest engineering. This program emphasizes analytical skills required for evaluating engineering systems and integrates the mechanical and economic requirements of forest operations with the biological requirements of the forest.

Forest engineering students’graduate ready to help meet global demands for wood products while sustaining water, habitat and other forest resources.

Students in this program have the option of a dual major in civil engineering offered in partnership with the OSU College of Engineering.

NATURAL RESOURCES
Oregon State is ranked third in the nation (College Factual) for natural resources education. Students in this program have a working knowledge of a board
span of natural resources, their diversity and interdependence and the critical relationships between humans and the environment. This program is for students interested in an interdisciplinary approach to resource management and a career dealing with land use, water resources, environmental policy, natural resource education and related endeavors.

This program is available at the flagship Corvallis campus, in Bend at OSU-Cascades and online through OSU Ecampus.

RENEWABLE MATERIALS
The renewable materials degree program teaches students how to help the world replace oil-based and other non-renewable materials with plant-based renewable alternatives and shape the future of wood products design and advanced manufacturing.

Students learn how wood, bamboo and other materials can be used to provide housing, consumer products, energy and other benefits to society.

Students in the renewable materials program have four options of study to choose from: art and design, marketing and management, science and engineering and advanced manufacturing.

TOURISM, RECREATION + ADVENTURE LEADERSHIP
The tourism, recreation and adventure leadership (TRAL) degree program prepares students to work in the fast-growing outdoor industry. Courses explore how
people relate to environments and how recreation and natural spaces can work together for the benefit of both the population and land.

Students have four options of study to choose from: adventure leadership education; nature, eco and adventure tourism; outdoor recreation management and sustainable tourism management.

This program is available on the Corvallis campus and at OSU-Cascades in Bend.

AMONG THE BEST IN THE WORLD
Oregon State University consistently ranks among the top in the world for forestry, natural resources, recreation and wood science research. OSU was recently ranked number two in the world in forestry by the Center for World University Rankings and ranked third in the nation for natural resources studies by College Factual.

GRADUATING OUR FUTURE LEADERS
Dedicated to preparing the future leaders of our working forest landscapes, the college awarded 372 undergraduate degrees in FY 2017 and FY 2018.

MAKING OPPORTUNITY AFFORDABLE
Through the generosity of our donors, the college regularly awards more than $500,000 in undergraduate scholarships each year. During FY 2017 and FY 2018, the college awarded more than $1.10 million in undergraduate scholarship support with individual awards ranging from $1,000 to $9,000.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IS KEY
The college prides itself on educating and preparing its students to be competent, innovative and professional members of fields across the forest landscape. Students in all programs are encouraged, and in some majors, required, to complete work experience in their chosen fields. The Mentored Employment Program enables faculty to hire undergraduate students on research and other projects with an expectation of at least one hour of direct mentoring per week. The program supports about 20 students per year.

A PATHWAY TO SUCCESS
The college remains a strong partner with Oregon’s community colleges. In FY 2018, the college entered detailed pathway agreements with Umpqua Community College and Southwestern Oregon Community College. This enables students to find financially accessible pathways to the college’s degree programs.

A GROWING COLLEGE
Since the launch of the college’s recruitment plan in 2017, enrollment has increased. In FY 2018, applications and admitted students to college programs were up almost 20 percent. Traffic to program websites increased by 300 percent over previous years. The college welcomed 174 new first-year and transfer students to its degree programs for fall 2018, a 25 percent increase over the previous year and the largest incoming class in college history.

PARTNERING WITH TRIBAL COMMUNITIES
The college continues to provide leadership and facilitation of OSU faculty, staff, and Tribal partners in the development of a Native American Educational Pathways proposal. The college co-organized and cosponsored the Oregon Indian Education Association’s annual conference, held on the Corvallis campus May 1-2, 2018. In addition, the college is collaborating with OSU colleagues on an Oregon Sea Grant proposal entitled “Engaging Collaborative College Pathways for Native American Youth in Coastal Tribes,” and partners with the Intertribal Timber Council to provide an additional $2,5000 in scholarships to recipients of the ITC Truman D. Picard Scholarships.

Growing up in Madras, Quinton Big Knife worked for timber companies during breaks from school and soon decided he wanted to pursue a forestry degree at Oregon State University.

“I just really like being out in the woods,” says the Oregon State senior. “It’s exciting to see a forest go from unmanaged to managed and to see the difference it makes.”

To ease his transition to Oregon State, Big Knife participated in the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program.

The LSAMP program at Oregon State, funded by the National Science Foundation, is dedicated to increasing the number of traditionally underrepresented students successfully completing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) baccalaureate degree programs. LSAMP also works to increase the number of students interested in and qualified for undergraduate research and graduate level studies.

“The program was really helpful,” Big Knife says. “The college community is really great, and I have made a lot of great connections, especially since I started professional school.”

Big Knife participates in the Oregon State student chapter of the Society of American Foresters (SAF), serving as vice chair. He is also involved in undergraduate research.

“The work is really fun and educational,” Big Knife says. “The project is biomass research. We sample and take measurements of trees on different national forests, and help make biomass equations to inform land management decisions.”

To conduct his research, Big Knife often spends eight days in the forest at a time, which he enjoys.

“I love going out to the College Research Forests for labs. Having them so close to campus is awesome. Learning how to timber cruise from a book is different from doing it yourself. You get your measurements, get your data, and really understand what the numbers mean,” he says.

While Big Knife isn’t sure where life after graduation will take him, he feels prepared to work in the forestry industry and is excited to implement active forest management techniques across our landscapes.

“I think agencies need more resources to carry out active forest management plans,” Big Knife says. “And the public needs more information about what active forest management looks like. I am excited for my future career as a forester and silviculturist.”

How long have you been at Oregon State?

I started in my position in March a little while after I finished my master’s degree in applied anthropology here at Oregon State. Applied anthropology is an interesting subset of anthropology because it solves real-world problems, and the program here at OSU is very unique in actually being labelled an applied anthropology program.

That’s great! What does your job look like?

As the online program coordinator, I manage the master of natural resources program and the three certificates we have in FES. My job resembles that of an academic advisor at times, though I do a lot of admin work as well. I really like helping guide our students through a process that may feel overwhelming. That brings me a lot of satisfaction.

You came here for your master’s program, so where are you from originally?

Oklahoma, but I’ve been in Oregon about five years now, and I don’t think I’ll ever move back there. I love the weather and the people here.

What do you do when you’re not working?

I live with my sister. She moved here last year, and we do a lot of cooking and baking together. Our mother always used baking to relieve her stress, which isn’t necessarily ideal, but we inherited the habit. My sister has also been filling our home with plants, which is nice because I usually kill them.

What’s your favorite thing to bake or cook?

I love to make ginger snap cookies. I got an apple coffee cake recipe from one of the grad students that I want to try soon. I also love to cook soup. I just made a great chicken tortilla soup.

Have you watched or read anything interesting lately?

I really like scary movies. One of my favorites lately is ‘Hereditary,’ It’s not for everyone, but it’s very good. Right now I’m reading a book called ‘The Cooking Gene,’ which is very interesting.

What is something you can do better than anyone else you know?

Hmm. I can snap pretty loud with pretty much all my fingers, and we just figured out that my sister can’t snap at all, so that’s kind of weird.

Which of the seven dwarves do you identify with?

Right now, Sneezy, because the Willamette Valley hit me hard in 2018. I’ve heard from several people that if you don’t have allergies when you start living here, you will get them anyway because there’s so much grass pollen.

Anything else?

I love to chat, if anyone ever wants to visit the FES office. I especially love to hear about people’s travels or a new scary movie recommendation.

  • How long have you been at Oregon State?

21 years.

  • How did you end up working with computers and technology?

Well, both my dad and grandfather graduated with forest engineering/civil engineering degrees from Oregon State. My dad is a civil engineer, and I decided in high school that I needed to be an engineer, but I didn’t want to be a civil engineer. I was really excited to learn about computers, so I became a computer science major.

  • How do you make sure you’re keeping up with the changes in your industry?

Google is your friend, and it’s important to be able to fly by the seat of your pants and keep at it.

  • What does your life look like outside of work?

I like knitting and sewing. I also have a beautiful, two-year-old granddaughter that I love to engage with. We live on 10 acres, so I do a lot of outdoor wandering with my two dogs.

  • How did you get into sewing and knitting?

My grandmother taught me to sew when I was a member of 4-H. In my early 20s, I went to a quilt-in-a-day class and got hooked, so most of my sewing now is quilting. I’ve only been knitting for about 10 years. My mom taught me, and it was something fun we could do together. Now, it keeps me from falling asleep on the couch at night.

  • Any other hobbies?

Beaver sports! I’ve maybe missed a handful of home football games since 1984. We go to football, basketball, gymnastics and baseball events on a regular basis, rain or shine, and sometimes we even travel to see the Beavers.

  • If you were an athlete –  in the Olympics – what would be your sport?

Maybe curling? My husband and I play bocce ball on the beach, so maybe it’s kind of similar.

  • What’s your favorite breakfast food?

Waffles with peanut butter and syrup.

Cameron Salvitelli discovered wood science during his second year at Oregon State. He’s proud that despite the time it took for him to find his path, he will graduate in four years.

Renewable materials sounded so different and unique to me but it also sounded very versatile. There are four unique, customizable options, and I like to have options,” Salvitelli says. “It was easy for me to connect with the teachers and the people around me because we all had a passion for the outdoors and then it stemmed a little more specifically into wood specifically.”

Salvitelli’s favorite part of the program is the hands-on learning.

“You learn a lot of different options, and then you learn about the whole industry and finally you get down to the mechanics of wood and the science behind it and how it works,” he says.

Salvitelli says his senior year is challenging.

“We think about how we feed the industry and how we manufacture, and these are the opportunities on the business side of things. I feel confident in my options for the future,” he says. “Anybody can make money their own way in business but for me it was about finding a passion that I could pursue which matched those business interests.”