Staff Q&A: Terina McLachlain

How long have you been at Oregon State?

I moved here from Alaska in 2008 with eight kids in tow to attend graduate school at Oregon State. I graduated in 2010 with a master’s in adult education and a specialization in virtual learning environments. Soon after that I was hired as an OSU Ecampus advisor for the natural resources program. In 2014, I became the program coordinator for natural resources and I’ve been here ever since.

Awesome. What should people know about the program?

The program has seen steady growth since its inception. We’ve had two big curriculum revisions- most recently in the summer of 2018. Our revisions help us adapt to the changes in the field of resource management, the needs of employers, and the interests of the students. We are constantly analyzing and making sure we’re meeting their needs.

 

Tell me about the students you advise.

I love our students! They’re on the forefront of whatever is going on in the world. Right now there’s a huge interest in issues like sustainability, climate change, food issues and more. Our students go everywhere and do all kinds of jobs from land management to environmental education to law.

Do you have a natural resources background?

No. My bachelor’s degree is in visual communications. I became interested in natural resources and education while living in rural Alaska for 20 years. I homeschooled my eight children, and we often had moose and other wildlife wandering through our back yard. Most of our family memories are intimately connected with wilderness or wildlife.

 

Wow. Tell us more about that experience.

Alaska was one of the first states to have a state-funded homeschool program, and I got very involved in a leadership role in alternative education. My kids used an online curriculum and that was how I first got involved with online education. It was great because we lived in the middle of nowhere, but my kids had the opportunity to participate in scientific field studies and communicate with people all over the world.

Tell us about your large family!

The tribe has grown up and I have only one left in the house. She will graduate from high school in 2019. The other seven are either in college or already finished with their degree; four have graduated or are currently at Oregon State, one graduated from the University of Oregon, one from Western Oregon University, one currently taking a gap year.  It’s important to me that they not carry a lot of student debt, so they all worked and paid their own ways through school. I am really proud of my kids.

 

What do you do when you’re not working?

I love gardening and cooking and spending time with my expanding family as my kids get married. My son is getting married this summer, and his fiancé has a six-year-old son, so I’m becoming a grandmother, and I’m loving it. We are a very nerdy family. We get together on Mondays and play Dungeons and Dragons.

 

What do you like to cook?

I love baking bread. I’m working on perfecting my sourdough right now.

2019 Dean’s Dinner and Awards Ceremony

This year’s Dean’s Dinner was held on May 14, after the grand opening of the A. A. “Red” Emmerson Advanced Wood Products Laboratory.

After opening remarks from Anthony Davis, Interim Dean for the College of Forestry, three outstanding alumni were honored. Jim Johnson, interim department head of Forest Engineering, Resources & Management, presented the award to Mike Cloughesy. Mike graduated from OSU with a M.S. in Forest Science in 1983 and is currently the Director of Forestry for the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, a statewide forestry education agency. He is responsible for the development and implementation of OFRI’s forestry education programs for landowners and the general public.

Troy Hall, department head of Forest Ecosystems and Society, presented the award to Cristina Eisenberg. Cristina graduated from OSU with a PH.D. in Forestry and Wildlife in 2012. She has worked as the Chief Scientist at Earthwatch Institute, an organization based in Boston, Massachusetts since 2014.

Eric Hansen, department head of Wood Science and Engineering, presented the award to Jerrold E. Winandy. Jerrold graduated from OSU with a PH.D. in Wood Science and Engineering in 1993. He is now principal partner of Winandy & Associates LLC and an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Congratulations to each of our outstanding alumni!

Each year the College of Forestry is honored and privileged to award graduate fellowships and undergraduate scholarships to deserving new and returning students. 134 undergraduate students were selected to receive scholarships totaling $486,060 for the 2019-20 academic year. Nicole Kent, our head advisor, helped congratulate these students. Twenty six graduate students, both Master- and PhD- level, received college fellowships totaling just over $121,500 for the 2019-20 academic year.

Donor contributions make a difference in the lives of our students by allowing them to fulfill their dreams of a college education, and to be successful contributors in our communities after graduation. These are the stewards of our forest ecosystems and economies, and I cannot think of a greater return on investment than their education. Donors and alumni, thank you for your wonderful generosity and outstanding contributions to the College!

To honor the dedication shown by those who support students in the College, two faculty awards were presented. The Xi Sigma Pi Julie Kliever Mentorship Award went to Bogdan Strimbu and the Aufderheide Award to Laurie Schimleck.

The evening wrapped up with two student awards. The winner of the Pack Essay Award was Paul B. Pliess for his essay: “Multicultural Stakeholders in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge”. The Photo of the Year award went to Graham Lyons, for his photo taken in the California Coastal Redwoods.

Staff Q&A: Autumn Granger

What was your journey to the College of Forestry?

I did my undergrad in business and a minor in economics at the University of Oregon and worked a few different jobs, including in the Admissions Office at Western Oregon University, and I really loved the environment there. To get the type of university job I wanted, I needed a master’s degree so I decided to come to Oregon State to get my master’s in counseling. After that, I worked at LBCC in the TRIO program and in the Horticulture Department at Oregon State. I moved over here to the College of Forestry in 2014.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

The students. I wouldn’t be doing this if I didn’t enjoy working with the students. It’s really cool to see their development from start to finish. They really grow in confidence.

What do you do when you’re not working?

I like to kayak when the weather is good. I read a lot and watch some TV. I’m a parent to two teenagers who can’t drive themselves yet, so I spend a lot of time shuttling them between activities.

What have you been watching and reading lately?

I’m watching True Blood – about 10 years too late – and I just read a book called The Nature Fix, which is very interesting and relates a little bit to my work.

What job did you want to be when you were a kid?

I was never anyone who had a great sense of direction from a young age, but I did love art as a kid, and I think I wanted to be an artist at one point.

If you could only eat tacos or sushi for the rest of your life, which would it be?

Tacos! I’m a vegetarian and have been for about 30 years now. I also love Thai food, Mexican food, and I would eat pizza every day if I could. There isn’t much I don’t like, except for bananas.

Staff Q&A: Ryan Brown

How long have you been at Oregon State? How did you get here? What’s your career journey been like?

I actually attended grad school in the College of Forestry, graduating in 2006.  I worked on the Willamette and Gifford Pinchot National Forests as a Recreation Planner for a few years before starting my position with the OSU Research Forests in 2012.  I would say it’s the best job yet, except for the two summers I spent as a Wilderness Ranger in the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness when I was an undergrad.

What do you love about your job?

I love working out here at Peavy Arboretum.  I can walk outside at any time and find a snake in the planter boxes, watch the birds, or go for a quick walk or run on the trails.  While I don’t get to work in the field as much as I’d like, all of my work is tied to the land and how people connect with it.  Finding ways to help people form personal connections with nature is my main motivator.  Also, I work with really wonderful co-workers, students, volunteers and visitors.

What do you do when you’re not working?

I have an awesome partner, two little kids, a dog, two cats and five chickens who make life fun and busy.  I also really enjoy writing fiction, knitting, cooking, spending time with my extended family, and playing time outside.

 

What have you consumed within the pop culture world lately. Got any good books, movies, shows or podcasts to share?

I’m really embarrassed to say how caught up I am in the last season of Game of Thrones and definitely spent a sleepless night this week reliving zombie battle scenes in my head.  I pretty much enjoy most sci-fi and fantasy tv shows, regardless of apparent quality, especially ones with queer characters.

 

What’s your favorite food?

Not-so-sweet chocolate cake with a chocolate buttercream frosting and a giant glass of milk.

If you were an animal, what kind of animal would you be?

I would like to be a cat, primarily because I would be able to sleep whenever I want to, wherever I want to.  Also, I would be very honest about how I feel at all times, and would enjoy small pleasures such as warm sunshine, cuddling, and chasing lasers.

Staff Q&A: Cathy Knock

Welcome to Oregon State! You started your job a few weeks ago. How is it going?

I say that it’s like drinking from a fire hose, but it’s good. There are lots of different things to consider. I worked at the University of Idaho before, and Oregon State is much bigger, and the College of Forestry is much bigger. There are different processes and what feels like thousands of trainings. I haven’t felt very effective yet.

What is your job, exactly?

My title is ‘targeted research coordinator.’ I’ll be helping to manage some of our internal funding sources. I’ll work very closely with the TallWood Design Institute to manage those funds and McIntire-Stennis research funds as well. I’ll also help Melora during busy times.

 

What do you do when you’re not working?

I love teaching people about using essential oils. I do that on the side.

What are your favorite oils?

Lavender, lemon and peppermint. They’re amazing during allergy season.

 

What is your favorite meal?

Probably literally the one that will kill me someday: fettuccini alfredo.

What would you do if you won the lottery?

I would pay off all my debt and put money aside for my children and future grandchildren, and then I would want to travel. My oldest daughter was born in Iceland so I would want to take here there to see where she was born and then also go visit my youngest daughter who now lives in Australia.

Staff Q&A: Sandy Jameson

How did you end up here in the College of Forestry?

I’m a third-generation Beaver! I ran track here, and after I graduated, I lived in California for a year and a half before going back to school to get my teaching certificate so I could be a physical education teacher, but at that time, the job market was really competitive, so one of my friends suggested I get a job on campus. I worked in the registrar’s office for five years and in The School of Civil and Construction Engineering for a month shy of 20 years. I’ve been here for five.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

The people. I love my colleagues and the students I advise.

 

Do you still run? What are your other hobbies?

I can’t run anymore, unfortunately. I had two knee surgeries, and I didn’t get the therapy I needed right away, so I never got back into. I like to play computer games and spend time with my family. I have one sister who lives here in town, and she has two kids. My older son lives in Albany with his three kids. I have step son in New Zealand, and we were able to visit him there about five years ago.

That’s amazing. Do you travel a lot?

Not really, but I do go to Maui every year. We like to go for the women’s basketball tournament and experience 84-degree and sunny December days.

 

Have you read any good books lately?

Right now I’m rereading the Hunger Games. I love those types of books.

 

If you were an ice cream flavor, what kind would you be?

Chocolate. It’s my favorite. And it has to be Umpqua ice cream.

What’s the scariest thing you’ve done for fun?

I’ve been zip-lining in Hawaii a few times, and I enjoy white-water rafting. My sister wants to skydive, but I would never do that.

Staff Q&A: McKenzie Huber

You’re an OSU alumna, right? How did you end up here at the College of Forestry?

I graduated with my degree in merchandizing management in 2010. During college I was a START leader and worked in New Student Programs. I was involved in Greek life on campus and held leadership positions for my chapter and Panhellenic council. When I started to think about life beyond college, I knew I didn’t want to enter the corporate world. I loved my own academic advisor, and I attribute the fact that I didn’t fail out of college to her, so I went straight to grad school in the college student services administration program. After that, I advised the design program as it moved from PHHS to COB, then sociology and now natural resources.

What’s different about being an advisor in the College of Forestry than anywhere else on campus?

Our group is well-respected across campus. I love the people I work with, and I love the students I advise. They are often nontraditional students, veterans or active military, and they care about a wide range of issues that are important to me as well.

What do you do when you’re not working?

I chase my 19-month-old daughter around. My life has changed so much since becoming a parent. Right now I am enjoying watching her experience new things like swimming and going to the beach. It’s fun to see her excitement and joy!

Watching anything good on Netflix?

I love Grace and Frankie. I’m a Netflix binger for sure.

 

What about books? Are you a reader?

Right now, I read a lot of parenting books, but I did just finish Michelle Obama’s book and was able to see her speak in Portland. She also spoke at my graduate commencement. It was an honor to be able to see her twice in one lifetime.

 

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten?

A pickled pig’s tail. I’m pretty sure it gave me an infection.

Fire summit brings experts together

In March 2018, Oregon State hosted the inaugural Fire Summit in Portland. This event aimed to identify viable forest management practices that could help mitigate the risks and impacts of high-severity fire events in the West.

About 30 scientists, land managers and forest policy experts were in attendance. They came from five states and British Columbia, and represented six universities, seven federal land management agency offices, departments or research units, four private forestland management entities, and two cities.

The summit closed with a call to action from Oregon Governor Kate Brown.

“It has been a great opportunity for us to reflect on the challenges our region has faced and the challenges to come, to share best practices, exchange data and research and discuss insights we learn from fighting wildfires,”

Brown said. She went on to discuss the prevalence of wildfire in the West and the risk to communities, economies and livelihoods. Brown said that collaborations – like the Fire Summit – will be key in preventing devastating wildfires.

“By taking an ‘all-lands, all-hands’ approach and committing to work together across jurisdictional boundaries, we can sustain robust rural economies and preserve our natural resources for future generations,” Brown said.

Anthony S. Davis, interim dean of the College of Forestry agrees, “The Western USA is home to the world’s leading scientists who focus on fire on our landscapes. The Fire Summit was a unique opportunity for those scientists to interact with the policymakers who are asking for guidance in addressing this phenomenal challenge.”

The collective remarks of the panelists and speakers offered a big-picture perspective of the intertwined views of fire in the West, from the variety of jurisdictions, landscapes and vegetation types, and cultural experiences and expectations.

The experts compiled their feedback and made specific recommendations:

• Expand strategic use of commercial thinning, prescribed fires, and managed wildfire as forest management tools.

• Improve coordination across jurisdictions and ownership boundaries.

• Develop and implement cross-boundary ‘pre-fire response’ plans and strategies.

• Address inequities associated with liability for cross-boundary fires.

• Invest in data mapping, risk assessment, and applied research that directly supports cross-boundary management and suppression.

Oregon State officials recognize discussions like this are critical for encouraging stakeholder engagement when it comes to wildfire issues.

Work is also underway to identify opportunities to directly and regularly inform federal elected officials and staff in Washington, D.C., about summit outcomes and subsequent efforts. Direct dialogue and discussion of the opportunities for real progress is an important goal of Summit participants seeking to inform policies designed to help mitigate the risks and impacts of high-severity fire events in the West.

“The scale of our fire problem is likely measured in decades and centuries, not a handful of years, and across millions of acres, not localized forests and landscapes,” says Davis. “To address this serious challenge, we have to step out of our own way and not go back to the false promise of landscape stability maintained through unsustainable practices. The Fire Summit served to bring the widest range of partners to the table for a first conversation in this direction.”

Welcoming art, welcoming everyone

Blank walls in the Richardson Hall knuckle inspired the first College of Forestry art contest in 2017. Temporary walls replaced the connection point to old Peavy Hall, as construction began on the new Oregon Forest Science Complex.

The college’s faculty and staff found themselves scattered throughout other campus buildings including Richardson, Snell and Strand Hall and needed a reason to come together.

The first art contest and show with the theme, ‘The Other Side,’ was held February 17, 2017, and diversity was key to organizers and participants.

All faculty, staff and students were invited to participate, and art mediums chosen were as diverse as the people creating them. The contest saw paintings, sculptures, wood working, photography and more. The pieces were judged by representatives throughout the college and campus.

With the College of Forestry’s commitment to equity, inclusivity and diversity, 2017 also saw the formation of the college’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee. The college and committee are devoted to addressing DEI issues in the realm of forestry and natural resource management – through education, research and public engagement. The committee will draw fully and inclusively on the power and force of human imagination, experience and creativity to meet the needs of today’s world.

With this in mind, the art show continued in 2018 with the theme of ‘Innovation.’

Assistant Professor Seri Robinson requires students in the art and design option within the renewable materials program to participate in the art show each year.

“It gives the students a chance at expression using media they are familiar with,” Robinson says. “Because they all have a deep science background in wood and forests, they can apply deeper meaning to art created with the art show’s theme in mind.”

Robinson thinks the art shows have been a great success. “We’ve had some really great work submitted,” Robinson says. “And it’s been a great opportunity for students to talk about their feelings about the college climate, especially in terms of diversity, in a more public forum.”

Staff Q&A: Misty Magers

How long have you been at Oregon State?

I’ve been here 20 years. I’ve worked in the College of Forestry and the College of Agricultural Sciences. I moved back to the College of Forestry for good in 2006, and I’m currently the administrative manager for the department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

The people. That’s why I came back to the college. Everyone is very friendly and fun to laugh with. We had so much fun at the college’s holiday party this year.

 

What do you do outside work?

I like to go camping all year long, ride four wheelers and travel.

Where are some of your favorite spots?

My latest trips were to Yellowstone and Grand Tetons National Parks, and also to Arizona. I like to see new things.

 

Are you a native Oregonian?

Yes. I’ve lived here my whole life and graduated from Philomath High School. I don’t think I’ll ever leave. My kids are here and my new granddaughter.

What’s your favorite food?

Mexican food!

 

How do you unwind after work?

I play a lot of mindless Facebook games.

 

If you could eliminate one thing from your daily routine, what would it be and why?

Probably vacuuming my long-haired cat’s hair.

 

What is your favorite part of the holidays? 

Probably just spending time with my kids and laughing together.

 

You have a lot of bears in your office. What’s that about? 

I collect bears! I like them because they seem so soft and cuddly, not that I’d like to run into one in the wild!