The Career Fair is a great place to talk to potential employers. You know you will have the opportunity to talk to many employers, but how exactly do you turn the Career Fair into a job? Below are some ways you can stand out!

  • Dress for Success- Appearance plays a big part in the way that potential employers sees you. Body language is 55% of what employers use to select who they want to work for them. When it comes to the Career Fair it is important that you are looking your best. You want to stand out from others who aren’t looking professional and make it easier for employers to lean towards you. For men, a suit would be ideal but slacks, a button up shirt and a tie also work. For women, a suit (pants or skirt are fine) are also ideal, but you can also pair pants with a professional-looking blouse, blazer or sweater and make sure to wear a comfortable yet classy shoe (either flat or pumps are appropriate).
  • Resumes and Cover Letters- Having a strong resume and cover letter gives you a chance to stand out after meeting employers at the Career Fair. Employers get stacks of resumes after Career Fairs and you want to make sure that yours stands out. Format is important but it is more important to tailor your experience to the company or organization you will be talking to.
  • Be Prepared- There are many ways you should prepare yourself for the Career Fair. Doing research about a company or organization that you are interested in is very important. It is not a good idea to approach an employer and ask them what they do. You want to be prepared to talk to them about why you are interested in their company or organization and the different ways that you can fill their needs. You also want to prepare your “30 second spiel,” which highlights your resume, skills, and interests and it is always good to ask questions.
  • Follow up – After talking to an employer, ask for his/her business card and make sure to follow up with an email thanking them for their time and that you look forward to talking to them again in the future. You could even set up an informational interview which could get you connected to even more people.

These are some ways that you can turn a Career Fair into a job. Don’t be afraid to think about it as you interviewing employers to see if they fit your needs. You want to make sure you go in with a game plan and confidence, once you do that you will be ahead of everyone else.

Posted by Silver Trujillo, Career Services Assistant

The Office of Community and Diversity has a Multicultural Resource guide that directs you to an office on campus that can further help you explore areas you are interested in.

This office also helps you transition into a career after college by offering the PROMISE (Professional and Managerial Internships in State Employment) program (see office website).

This is an internship program that gives you an opportunity to gain skills in a professional office in/ around Corvallis. Included in the program, are professional development workshops. Finally it wraps up with a Poster Galleria, celebrating what you have learned and the projects accomplished.

I can personally recommend it; I was one of three interns for OSU’s Business Affairs Office. For me it was a good way to continue professional etiquette in an office and practice and improve my communication skills. I was stationed in the ID Center and some of the projects that I completed were: Creating a workflow during busy hours in the summer, organization of a database and compiling a card list for departments at OSU, translating brochures from English to Spanish, and many other duties. Aside from that there were a variety of different jobs other interns did with the City of Corvallis, Human Resources, Video production and many more. PROMISE also included workshops to improve on interpersonal communications and also got to hear from professionals of color from local companies, such as Hewlett Packard.

The way I have been able to find interesting jobs that allowed me to contribute my college experience and skills have all been from being a part of a Listserve! Specifically, the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) and College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) list serves. Currently I receive e-mails from 4-5 list serves. It is helpful to join your College’s list serv, a club or student organization list serv and different departments list servs around campus. You never know what will show up! So put yourself out there and explore departments to see how you can begin your career.

Here are some suggestions to get you started:

Resources for specific populations-Career Services provides a whole section dedicated to resources for underrepresented populations.

Disability Access Services- Internships can also help find a summer internship for students with a disability.

University Housing & Dining

Begin your search for clubs/organizations

Attend the “Swing into Spring” held by Student Leadership & Involvement next Tuesday, Feb. 22 from 11-2:30 in the MU Ballroom.

Finally, some programs such as the Pre-therapy/Allied Health Club, conduct mock interviews, do graduate school visits, and offer community service hours.

There are many resources available and remember it never hurts to ask! And here at Career Services we are here to help.

Posted by Marisol Cardoza, Career Services Assistant

Looking for unique opportunities as an undergraduate to serve your community and gain experience for your resume?  Entering the job market can be an unsettling process for some students, but participating in unique opportunities can make you stand out in comparison to other applicants.  As an undergraduate the most valuable experience I gained was serving as a student representative on a search committee for the new Director of University Housing and Dining.

Through serving on search committees as a student you can gain valuable information on what potential employers are looking for in resumes, cover letters, and interviews.  You also have the opportunity to represent the student perspective to potential candidates.  Additionally, there are plenty of networking possibilities when serving on a committee with campus administration and faculty.

Although serving on a search committee can be a time intensive process it is certainly worth the time commitment.  Through my work on a search committee I learned of job opportunities and gained a great respect for the faculty and staff I worked with.  Connections I made as an undergraduate on the search committee afforded me the opportunity to secure a position at Oregon State University as an employee while I attended graduate school.

If you are interested in serving on a search committee contact your college or department to see if there are opportunities available.  If you are a student worker on campus try talking with you supervisor about ways to get involved in committee work within your department.

Posted by Rachel Allen, Career Services Intern

When I was ten years old my grandpa and I went to Honduras to visit my aunt, who was serving in the Peace Corps. During the two weeks I was there I learned a few key phrases in Spanish (¿donde esta el bano?), experienced a new culture, made new friends, learned how to make tortillas from scratch, and was awoken early each morning by a rooster. The experience made me look at the world from another perspective and made me appreciate many of the things I took for granted living in the United States, such as clean water, education, and paved roads. That trip was a pivotal moment in my life; I promised myself that I too would one day join the Peace Corps.

Realizing the Dream

In May 2006, my dream of serving in the Peace Corps came true when my husband and I departed the United States for Bolivia, a land-locked country in South America. We arrived in the city of Cochabamba, where we spent three months in training. Half the day we took Spanish classes and the other part we learned about Bolivian culture and gained more skills in our project areas. We were part of a group of 30 other volunteers.  Each of us lived with a different Bolivian host family. After those three months of training we were officially “Peace Corps Volunteers” and we were then sent to our sites, where we would spend the next two years. My husband and I were placed in Huacareta, in the region of Chuquisaca, a rural village of about 1,000 people.

Working in a Bolivian Community

My main project was to work with the schools in and around Huacareta. I worked with teachers, introducing them to a more interactive teaching style. I also taught children and women’s groups the importance of sanitation, nutrition, dental hygiene, AIDS/HIV prevention, and computer skills. One of the most rewarding experiences was working with a women’s group to start a peanut butter-making business. The women learned about proper food handling, the nutritious benefits of peanut butter, accounting methods, and working together as a team with specific roles. I thoroughly enjoyed working with them; throughout the process the women and I shared many stories and laughter, and I was able to learn so much about them. I also got to witness the empowerment that the women felt from earning their own money.

The Benefits of Service

Joining the Peace Corps is one of the best experiences of my life. I got to be immersed in another culture, learn a new language, make new friends, and most of all, I got to learn much about myself. Since being back home in the United States I have connected with other returned Peace Corps Volunteers and shared with others about Bolivia. Other benefits include a readjustment stipend, deferment of student loans, reduced graduate school tuition, noncompetitive eligibility for employment in the federal government, and of course the professional skills gained during service such as learning another language, cross-cultural understanding, and international experience.

Start Your Own Life-Defining Experience

I encourage anyone who has thought about living in another country and wants to share their skills and experiences with others to look into serving in the Peace Corps. Volunteers serve in 77 countries (Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central and South America, Europe, and the Middle East) and provide technical assistance in six program areas: education, youth and community development, health, business and information and communications technology, agriculture, and environment. If you have any questions or concerns about the Peace Corps or the application process, please contact me, I would love to talk with you. The Peace Corps website is another great resource: peacecorps.gov

My advice is to do your research about the program and talk to as many returned Peace Corps volunteers as you can about their experience. I love quotes and one that I think about often is by Samuel Johnson – “When making your choice in life, do not neglect to live.” Each day in the Peace Corps definitely made me feel alive.

Jen Busick
OSU Peace Corps Campus Representative
peacecorps@oregonstate.edu

541-737-2003

Posted by Jen Busick, Peace Corps Campus Representative and Career Resource Specialist