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Recycling – Tip of the Week: Special recyclables

May 25th, 2012

Recyclable of the week: Special recyclables

These are items that are not accepted in general recycle bins on campus, but can be recycled if collected separately. They are collected from departments and students living on campus (not from off campus, except during special collection events that are open to the public).

WHAT is recyclable and HOW to recycle it:

This information is also available in our online Recycle Guide and our brochure.

Special recyclables

Batteries: Classified as hazardous waste, batteries are recycled by Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), not Campus Recycling. Place in nearest battery recycling bin (Valley Library or UHDS service center) or request pick-up using EHS’s online hazardous waste pickup request form.

Confidential Materials: Please see our Confidential Records Destruction page for details on rates and the process.

Electronic Media (CDs, DVDs, floppy disks & their plastic cases): Collect in a box, mark “recycle” & place next to a regularly serviced recycle bin (our crew will pick it up the next time they’re servicing your building).

Electronics: All e-waste, working or not, should be sent to Surplus Property via a Surplus Pick-up Request (students living on campus can contact us to make arrangements). Electronics are either resold or recycled, depending on their condition. Please see our E-Waste page for more information.

Ink/Toner Cartridges: Collect in a box, mark “recycle” & place next to a regularly serviced recycle bin (our crew will pick it up the next time they’re servicing your building).

Metal Scrap: Request pick-up using our online request form or call at 7-2925. If you need a dumpster or bin to collect this material, please call to make arrangements.

Packing Peanuts: Polystyrene peanuts are not easily recycled, however, they are completely reusable (we reuse them for shipping)! We accept both plastic and biodegradable peanuts. (For Styrofoam blocks & sheets, see “Styrofoam,” below.) Please bag or box them, mark “recycle” & place next to a regularly serviced recycle bin (our crew will pick it up the next time they’re servicing your building).

Plastics, Special (rigid or film plastics not accepted in commingle): We may be able to collect these hard-to-recycle plastics if they are sorted out separately. Please contact us to discuss options.

Styrofoam: We are able to collect and recycle two types of Styrofoam blocks (1. rigid blocks that break apart into small pieces and 2. flexible blocks similar to a pool noodle) if they are separated into a bag or bin; please contact us to discuss options.

Wood Scrap: Request pick-up using our online request form or call at 7-2925. If you need a dumpster or bin to collect this material, please call to make arrangements.

If you prefer to drop off these special recyclables at our warehouse, please call out hotline at 737-2925 to arrange a time.

If you have questions on the recyclability of these or other items, please contact us.

This post is part of our Tip of the Week series for spring term 2012. Stay tuned to this blog on Mondays and our Facebook and Twitter accounts on Tuesdays for more in the future!

·Batteries: Classified as hazardous waste, batteries are recycled by Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), not Campus Recycling. Place in nearest battery recycling bin (Valley Library or UHDS service center) or request pickup using EHS’s online hazardous waste pickup request form.

·Confidential Materials: Please see our Confidential Records Destruction page.

·Electronic Media (CDs, floppy disks, cassettes, VHS tapes & their cases): Collect in a box, mark ‘recycle’ & place next to regularly serviced recycle bin.

·Electronics: All e-waste, working or not, should be sent to Surplus Property via a Surplus Pickup Request. Electronics are either resold or recycled (if not reparable or sellable). Please see our E-Waste page.

·Ink/Toner Cartridges: Collect in a box, mark ‘recycle’ & place next to regularly serviced recycle bin.

·Packing Peanuts: Polystyrene peanuts are not easily recycled, however, they are completely reusable (we reuse them for shipping)! We accept both plastic and biodegradable peanuts. For Styrofoam blocks & sheets, see below. Please bag or box them, mark ‘recycle’ and place next to a regularly serviced recycling bin.

·Scrap Metal & Wood: Request pickup using our online request form or call at 7-2529.

·Special Plastics (hard or film plastics not accepted in commingle): We may be able to collect these hard-to-recycle plastics if they are sorted out separately. Please contact us to discuss options.

·Styrofoam: We are able to collect and recycle Styrofoam packing material (blocks, sheets, etc) from OSU departments if it is separated into a bag or bin; please contact us to discuss options.

9 Responses to “Recycling – Tip of the Week: Special recyclables”

  1. [...] NEW! Recycling Tip of the Week: Special Recyclables. Did you know that all of the following is recyclable if collected separately: batteries, confidential materials, electronic storage media, electronics, ink/toner cartridges, scrap metal, packing peanuts, plastic bags and other film plastic, special hard plastics, Styrofoam and scrap wood? Get the how-to’s on Campus Recycling’s blog. [...]

  2. Jan Spitsbergen says:

    Hellow,
    I am wondering why styrofoam food containers are not recycled. The 1st Alternative Food Coop used to recycle them, now they do not. Jan

  3. Andrea Norris says:

    Hi Jan; good question. The recyclers have stopped accepting it and we don’t know of any places in Oregon that take it for recycling. The reasons it’s not accepted are: 1) Food contamination leads to odors, pests and mold issues that recyclers are no longer willing to deal with. There is no way for a Styrofoam collector to guarantee that all the containers are washed and free of food before sending to a recycler, as it takes too much time to monitor and wash items. 2) Some food trays are also a color other than white, for which there is no strong recycling market.

    Styrofoam products have a lot of airspace per volume, meaning it simply has little value as a raw material. This means that it costs money to recycle Styrofoam, so the first items to go are those of least value and/or highest labor to process.

    The only options that are local and free are either throwing it away in the trash or holding onto it in hopes that a recycling option becomes available in the future. And, of course, avoiding the stuff in the first place. :)

    Thanks for your question.

  4. Camille Freitag says:

    Can you elaborate on which types of foam can be recycled with Styrofoam? I had thought that only the hard and annoyingly squeaky stuff that is actually Styrofoam was acceptable, but I have now heard that the squishy foam in OK as well. What about foam wrapped in plastic, yellow (isocyanate?) foam, the thin wrapping foam (grey or white)? So many foams.

  5. Andrea Norris says:

    You are right, Camille, there are so many kinds! Our recycler is officially taking just 2 types:
    1) the white blocks you are describing (squeaky; if you bend them, they break apart and create foam “confetti”)
    2) the squishy foam similar in appearance and feel to a pool noodle (it is hard but bendable).

    They are not accepting foam that touches food, the plastic-wrapped kind or the really soft foam like that made into “egg crate” mattress toppers. The foam that they do accept needs to be clean and dry and have stickers removed. They ask that foam coolers be broken down. I will update the image in this blog to reflect the two types of foam that are accepted. Thank you!

  6. Camille Freitag says:

    Thanks for the clarification. I had a nice sign with pieces of non-recyclable foam stuck to it that is now missing along with our styrofoam bin and peanut bin. If I ever figure out who took it and why I will make a new sign, but also use your image.

  7. Andrea Norris says:

    Hi Camille, is this for on-campus collection? Do let us know if you need help with signage. Thanks!

  8. Camille Freitag says:

    It is (was) the Richardson Hall styrofoam collection, but it all went missing last week. Someone took both the block and peanut bins (both pretty full at the time) and all the associated signage (including a sign that was on the wall) and until I know why I don’t want to go to the trouble of replacing them.

  9. Blas Valenzuela says:

    yes, don’t throw those used batteries just yet. because junk lead-acid batteries can be recycled into fresh raw materials for the production of new batteries. so donate them to environmental agencies that can do the recycling for you. thanks for all the other tips!

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