Students across OSU will have the opportunity to enhance their professional sales skills, thanks to a newly launching initiative in the College of Business. The Sales Academy comes to OSU in the 2018-19 academic year with the backing of numerous regional and global corporate partners.

The Sales Academy combines both academic and extracurricular activities, giving students interested in developing or improving their knowledge of professional sales tactics and strategies.

The Sales Academy is centered on a series of learning modules that culminate with a resume-building certificate from the College of Business Sales Academy. An annual sales competition will pit area universities’ best sales teams in a real-world scenario to test their skills.

The Sales Academy extends from a corporate partnership wherein sponsoring businesses, those with a stake in cultivating a talented pool of sales employees, get involved as mentors, teachers and backers of the academy’s multiple learning opportunities.

Pacific Office Automation, title sponsor of the Sales Academy, is an office management and office information technology solutions provider with locations throughout the Pacific Northwest and Southwest United States.

POA President Doug Pitassi says that the topic of access to trained sales professionals is a common discussion point among his network of small- to medium-sized businesses owners and executives. These businesses all seek the same solution – a better supply of trained workers.

Pitassi also seeks to create a deeper understanding of the negotiating, relationship-building skills, and expertise of a sales professional. He seeks to elevate the value and sophistication of sales skills as a professional skill set.

“A big objective for me is to connect with students and convey that there’s a great deal of security in sales, and this is about an investment in your ability to conquer a great skill, whatever product or service you’re selling.”

Danelle Kronmiller, director of strategic partnerships at the College of Business, says that the POA title sponsorship is just one of the many ways that businesses can turn thought leadership on a solution that benefits an industry in particular or the economy of Oregon.

“POA has helped us address one area of concern that sales-driven business models face,” Kronmiller said. “We have room for more partners in the Sales Academy. But ultimately we are ready to execute on the next great idea that will support our students and contribute to the economy of Oregon.”

Paint manufacturer, distributor and seller paint coatings and related products Sherwin-Williams, is a bronze sponsor of the 2018 Sales Academy, and Modesto, Calif.-based E. & J. Gallo Winery, the largest winery in the world, also is a bronze sponsor.

 

 

 

Contact:

Danelle Kronmiller
Director of Strategic Partnerships
Oregon State University College of Business
Tel.: 541-737-6648

Email: danelle.kronmiller@oregonstate.edu
business.oregonstate.edu

 

About the OSU College of Business: The College of Business educates students for success in managing and developing sustainable, innovative enterprises in a dynamic economy. With strong graduate and undergraduate programs, internationally recognized scholarly research, and an emphasis on experiential learning, the college helps students and businesses succeed.

BA 260 teams, Launch Academy students and “Next Great Startup” pitch competitors wow judges with big ideas

 

Three minutes to pitch, another three to take questions, and then a few moments for judges to make notes. Through two days of competitions, hours of presentations on three separate competitive event platforms, the College of Business and OSU entrepreneurs filled Austin Hall awaiting their chance to pitch – and their chance to win startup funds.

This is InnovationX, the OSU Center of Excellence for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, which serves students of all majors across the university.

 

Launch Academy and BA 260 “Introduction to Entrepreneurship”

The second-year students of BA 260 “Introduction to Entrepreneurship,” and the business startups enrolled in Launch Academy incubator courses (BA 367 and BA 368) appeared in Stirek Auditorium Friday for their reckoning. These were the survivors – through the various elimination rounds across three separate panels of judges.

Team Creative Hub took the top prize of $1000 for BA 260 students, besting the elevator pitches of the more than 350 students enrolled in the course.

Among the Launch Academy competitors, ShoeBio, Medivac and Melaknow were the top-funded businesses of the 14 teams. Altogether Launch Academy startups earned more than $15,000 in support from the Giles Student Entrepreneurs Fund.

 

OSU Advantage Accelerator “Next Great Startup”

At the Thursday event, the engineering and business students competing in OSU Advantage Accelerator’s annual “The Next Great Startup” appeared for the preliminary showdown. Of those teams, Melaknow and Kickback will advance. These finalists from the preliminary competition will compete against student teams from across OSU during a university-wide competition held winter term.

There are patents pending; there are companies with legit annual sales; there are seasoned startup teams that have been catching the eye and ear and pocketbook of venture capitalists throughout the region. Here’s some more details of our students’ work and their incredible business ideas:

 

Medivac system refrigerates medications

Noah Hoffman opened his pitch with a dramatic statistic from the Hurricane Maria aftermath in Puerto Rico – in just two months after the disaster, deaths attributed to diabetes increased by 46 percent. He points out that insulin degrades within six hours at temperatures higher than 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

His startup Medivac provides a portable, reliable, and long-lasting refrigeration unit offering freedom and security for diabetics. His product is a hybrid cooling box about the size of a lunchbox that mixes passive and active cooling methods to provide long-lasting and secure cold storage for any biologic medication.

“Not only do we provide peace of mind for those without power, but we also enable everyday people who rely on temperature-controlled medications to travel, camp, and venture further than they’ve ever been able to before,” Hoffman said.

Medivac earned $2,000 in funding from the Giles Fund.

 

MelaKnow app screens moles for cancer

Eli Winkelman, for MelaKnow, points out that the most significant factor for surviving a skin cancer diagnosis is early detection. He also cites data that nationally dermatologists are in short supply, with appointment windows opening only six months into the future. Long enough for a patient to worry, or simply forget and move on.

MelaKnow is a skin cancer screening tool for primary care providers to better diagnose cancer with their smartphones. With MelaKnow’s machine-learning, primary care providers improve their diagnosis from 50 percent accuracy to 90 percent accuracy.

MelaKnow, which is currently applying for NSF grant funding, also earned $2,000 in funding from the Giles Fund.

 

ShoeBio.com streamlines online shoe shopping

Benjamin Steinhorn, presenting ShoeBio.com, describes it as “Trivago for sneakers.” His team harnesses big data with a patent-pending normalization algorithm to streamline the buying process, create price alerts for deals or other alerts for styles and sizes. His polished, functioning platform earned $2,500 in funding, but seeks six digits worth of capital investments.

“ShoeBio has a variety of monetization strategies,” Steinhorn explains. “Our largest revenue stream is affiliate marketing. We are in the process of becoming affiliated with all of the websites that we search which allows custom URL coding for each link. We have applied for 250 and will be approved for them within a week of when we applied. We will apply for new programs as soon as we find them, when new websites are added to the platform. Additionally, each affiliate program averages 7 to 8 percent commission payout.”

 

Dotmap Knife interface assists gaming event organizers

Graham Barber’s entrepreneurial passion is dotmap, a company that creates tools for game developers. Graham presented Knife, a platform that makes it easy to organize and sustain events called game jams, where people create games in a limited period of time.

Knife provides a robust, customizable web-based interface that helps organizers track participants, teams, submissions, and more — all of the moving parts of their event. With Knife, game jam organizers can spend less time building their own management system, and spend more time engaging with their community to run a better event.

Knife earned $500 in funding from the Giles Fund.

[Event photos]

Complete list of winners

Two finalists advance to the next stage of the Advantage Accelerator’s Next Great Startup. They’ll compete against the best OSU teams that survive the winter-term elimination rounds and were each awarded $500 cash prizes.

  • Melaknow
  • Kickback

 

BA 260 “Introduction to Entrepreneurship” class winners:

  • Creative Hub – $1,000
  • UpSprout – $500
  • Dress to Impress – $300

Other BA 260 that reached the final round (and winners of $100):

  • NannyNow
  • Impact Systems
  • Go Find Me
  • PassportBox
  • Endless Energy

 

Launch Academy (the incubator for OSU student entrepreneurs) awarded winners:

  • ShoeBio $2,500
  • Medivac $2,000
  • MelaKnow $2,000
  • Zazu $1,500
  • Soulful Boards $1,500
  • Poppins $1,000
  • PAI $1,000
  • Kickback $500
  • Sanctuary $500
  • Rental Consultant $500
  • BrakeBoy $500
  • Knife $500
  • Halo Holds $500
  • Gigspace $500

 

Business, leadership, health, strength and service to society ― these are some of the many torches our lineup of panelists carry to the first Corvallis-based Advancing Women in Leadership strategic discussion this month.

The November 29 meeting, hosted by the OSU Center for the Advancement of Women in Leadership and the OSU Women in Leadership student club, brings together Julie Jones Manning, former Corvallis mayor and vice president for marketing, public relations and community health promotion at Samaritan Health Services; Ilene Kleinsorge, professor and dean emeritus, OSU College of Business, and Marianne Vydra, deputy athletics director for administration/senior woman administrator, Oregon State Athletics.

The Corvallis discussion series follows the model of the highly successful Portland-based series now entering its third year of quarterly events. Though the Corvallis-based series does aim to facilitate student involvement, expanding the series makes OSU’s academic thought leaders, Corvallis and the area’s entrepreneurial-minded leaders even more accessible to our students.

These signature networking and discussion series are part of the core activities of the Center for the Advancement of Women in Leadership, founded with the mission to change the landscape of business leadership by moving women into leadership roles in industry and create the pathway for women’s perspectives to have equitable influence on business decisions and growth.

Thursday, Nov. 29, 5 to 7 pm  |  Austin Hall, Stirek Auditorium  |  Corvallis, OR 97331

RSVP

Read more about our panelists:

 

Julie Jones Manning is vice president for marketing, public relations and community health promotion at Samaritan Health Services, a Corvallis-based regional health system comprising hospitals, physicians and health plans serving Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties.

In addition to her responsibilities at Samaritan Health, Manning served as mayor of Corvallis for four years from 2010 to 2014.

Manning remains an active community volunteer. She co-chairs the Early Learning Hub of Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties and is a member of the Oregon State University Board of Trustees. She is also a board member of the Benton Community Foundation, Oregon Humanities and the Greater Oregon chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). She serves on the Oregon Community Foundation’s Leadership Council for the Southern Willamette region.

She was named Corvallis’ First Citizen in 2004.

 

Ilene Kleinsorge, professor and dean emeritus retired in June 2015 as the Sara Hart Kimball Dean of the College of Business at Oregon State University. Kleinsorge had served in that capacity for more than 12 years. She directed a business program that educated nearly 5,800 students including 3,900 business majors and pre-majors, nearly 850 business and entrepreneurship minors and more than 800 students in the School of Design and Human Environment.

A faculty member of the College of Business at OSU since 1987, she served as department chair of Accounting, Finance, and Information Management from 1995-2001 and again from 2001-2002. She was appointed dean in 2003. Most of Dean Kleinsorge’s teaching and research focused on cost and managerial accounting systems with emphasis on multinational companies and healthcare.

Kleinsorge also served as the technical advisor for the Governor’s Oregon Innovation Council, is past chair of the Western Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, was a member of the Executive Commercialization Advisory Council for OSU, and served on numerous boards. She was at Oregon State for 25 years and is often known to say, “I came for a job and stayed for the people.”

Marianne Vydra, deputy athletics director for administration/senior woman administrator, Oregon State Athletics, is a part of an executive team that has guided OSU Athletics into a new era that encompasses success on the fields of play, but also outside of the competitive arenas through leadership initiatives and academic programs.

Vydra was promoted to senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator in 2008 by then Director of Athletics Mitch Barnhart. In February 2015 CollegeADnamed her one of the top 10 senior woman’s administrators in the NCAA. She served as OSU’s interim director of athletics in July 2015.

As part of the executive team that oversees 17 sports and over 500 student-athletes, Vydra’s vast array of responsibilities include heading the senior staff strategic planning group, human resource management, student-athlete welfare (sports medicine, strength and conditioning, NCAA Life Skills, and the Leadership Institute), and is the supervisor for several men’s and women’s sports. She is the department’s liaison for Title IX/gender equity, student fees and the Athletic Advisory Council. Vydra also serves at the NCAA Certification Steward and assists with the department’s budget development.

The native of Missouri serves on numerous OSU, Pac-12 Conference and national governance committees. She currently is the chairperson for the NCAA Women’s Soccer and Softball Committees, is a member of the NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Committee and is on the President’s Commission on the Status of Women. Vydra recently served as the vice president of the executive board of the Pac-12 and has been a member of the Long Range Planning Committee, Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, the Diversity Initiative Committee, the women’s basketball tournament committee, and the league’s television committee.

(l to r) Lane Community College President Margaret Hamilton and OSU College of Business Dean Mitzi Montoya signed a degree partnership agreement today to open a fast-track pathway to a bachelor’s degree.

One year to a bachelor’s degree, with our Lane Community College fast-track arrangement

One year to a bachelor’s degree, you’ve read that right!

Graduates with a business associates of applied science from the Eugene, Ore.-based Lane Community College can earn their bachelors degree in business from Oregon State University in one year thanks to an innovative new plan. College of Business Dean Mitzi Montoya and Lane Community College President Margaret Hamilton signed an agreement today in Corvallis, the first fast-track arrangement between the two educators.

Lane Community College and OSU College of Business have developed the agreement for LCC associate of applied science business graduates to transfer to Oregon State University and complete the coursework necessary for a bachelor’s in just one year.

Oregon State University has degree partnerships with all seventeen Oregon community colleges to provide a smooth path for Oregon students to earn their four-year degree. However, the LCC agreement is the first of its kind to build out the expedited curriculum plan. This is a great opportunity that paves the way for similar partnerships between LCC and other colleges at OSU.

“We’ve looked for a partner to establish this model, and we expect others to follow suit,” said Hamilton. “It’s a great day for our business programs, and it has been wonderful to see how well our students are treated when they get here.”

The agreement effectively creates a “2 + 1” degree that opens up options for Lane business students that aren’t available locally. The agreement will save students hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars while completing a bachelor’s at an outstanding business school.

Under the agreement, OSU will accept up to 120 credit hours from LCC that will count toward undergraduate business administration degree requirements. Students will then complete 60 upper-division credit hours at OSU to earn their bachelor’s degree.

“We’re excited to pave the way with innovative partnerships that give more students access to an OSU degree,” Montoya said.

The agreement provides for close personal attention for students to ensure success, including orientations, trainings, personal advising, appointment scheduling, access to scholarships, access to upper-division hybrid courses, and other assistance.

LCC and OSU anticipate improved admission, retention, and degree completion as a result of the arrangement.

The agreement will be reviewed in three years.

Oregon State University College of Business

 

CORVALLIS – Oregon State senior Nathan Braaten has earned national recognition as he was selected as a candidate for the men’s soccer Senior CLASS Award.

To be eligible for the award, a student-athlete must be classified as an NCAA Division I senior and have notable achievements in four areas of excellence: community, classroom, character and competition.

An acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School®, the Senior CLASS Award focuses on the total student-athlete and encourages students to use their platform in athletics to make a positive impact as leaders in their communities.

Braaten is one of 30 men’s  soccer players to be tabbed as candidates, and joins Stanford’s Adam Mosharrafa as the only Pac-12 players to make the list.

Braaten is one of the co-founders of the DAM Worth It campaign, which was designed to raise awareness for mental health. The program has received national recognition, including winning a Giant Steps Award from the Institute for Sport and Social Justice. For his efforts, Braaten was also presented with a Waldo-Cummings Award, one of the most prestigious honors handed out by the Oregon State Faculty Senate Student Recognition and Awards Committee.

Braaten and his co-founder have earned a grant from the Pac-12 to expand Dam Worth It to all Pac-12 universities.

The senior has proven to be a dynamo in the classroom, earning Academic All-America Second Team honors last season as a finance major. The senior is a two-time CoSIDA Academic All-District selection and a two-time Pac-12 All-Academic First Team honoree.

Braaten has played in 53 games with the Beavers, including nine starts, and has scored a pair of goals and notched two assists. One of Braaten’s career highlights is a goal in a 2-0 win over No. 17 Pacific in the 2017 season.

 

 

National title is back home in Corvallis

We are all so crazy happy, and proud! Coach Pat Casey’s 2018 baseball team has succeeded with the redemption tour, winning Game 3 with style and confidence, and bringing home the NCAA College World Series champion title. We were with you every step of the way; we thank you for the gray hairs earned in Game 2, and we love you, Beaver Nation. Here’s how we saw it from the College of Business:

First of all, many thanks to our IT team who set up the big screen in Austin Hall. With the stillness of summer mode, the ebb and flow of emotions in the calls of ESPN’s announcers echoed through the building and brought faculty and staff to a standstill. It also stopped the families of future students in the building for START orientations.

Many of the usual suspects gathered, (you know who you are) most agreeing that there perhaps was a need to share heart medication after the Game 2’s breathtaking finish.

Melissa Elmore, office manager of the Austin Family Business Program, only wore her baseball jersey after 3 pm, since wearing it straight for the third day, she thought, might raise eyebrows. We love you, IT and our College of Business sports fans.

Calling the plays

ESPN – do we love you? Since it is nearly impossible to talk about Game 3 without mentioning that standing ovation of a Game 2, we have to talk about ESPN. (boo). What the heck! Publishing graphics on social media announcing the Razorbacks as the victors? What? I guess y’all must have been busy in the backroom making those graphics, and you didn’t see this play.

Yes, that’s right, we could watch that all day long: three Razorbacks running to catch the foul ball, and none of them actually doing so. We could shake our heads, and go on about “teamwork makes the dream work,” a favorite saying around here at the college. However, we’ll try to just cut some slack for those poor fellows from Arkansas who will replay that moment over and over in their heads. For the rest. of. their. lives.

Above all, ESPN, it shows you don’t know that beavers mean business; we only joke around occasionally, and almost never about our sports teams. We also never give up.

One more thing, ESPN, could you spare a good word for the best hitter in the nation, Nick Madrigal (sociology major), or must we be negative at his every at-bat? Indeed, he did not have the magic at the plate in these games as pitchers wisely opted to try and walk him.

But we at the college, where we know a thing or two about statistics – a .380 batting average in 2017, a .367 batting average in 2018 – were eagerly waiting for him to crack one out of the park so that we could hear you seething through your teeth.

Perhaps we should point out that congratulatory note on Twitter? From the Chicago White Sox? “Congrats to #WhiteSox No. 4 overall pick @NickMadrigal_3 and his @BeaverBaseball teammates on winning the College World Series!” Chicago White Sox – showing the love.

We love you, Chicago. We love our No. 4 draft pick. And Adley Rutschman, we love you, too.

College World Series Most Outstanding Player

Rutschman, the sophomore in business, won 2018 College World Series Most Outstanding Player. Rutschman, who also played a year of football at Oregon State, has an Oregonian sports pedigree extending back to his grandfather. Ad Rutschman eschewed a professional career with the Detroit Lions for coaching and mentoring, and retired from Linfield College as the winningest coach in college football. Linfield continues to build on the current all-divisions national record streak for consecutive winning seasons.

Not our legacy, but Beavers love legacies, and legends, too. And we see one forming in Rutschman.

Rutschman, whose position is catcher, is a team leader and strategic player with 83 RBIs for the season to set an OSU record. Since focusing solely on baseball, his batting average moved to a sick .408, from .234 in 2017. Rutschman set a College World Series record with 17 hits, batting .567 for the series.

College of Business junior Steven Kwan, drafted by Cleveland, was injured in earlier games and could not play in Game 3, and only a split second in Game 2. Kwan was usually the leader in the batting lineup as well as the centerfielder, and he gracefully became a leader in the dugout, cheering on teammates.

All told, the pitching of freshman Kevin Abel in Game 3, a complete game shutout allowing just two hits, is in the record books. It was his fourth win at the CWS. However, can we talk about the class act of College of Business sophomore Jake Mulholland, closing pitcher in Game 2, who took over for Abel in the top of the ninth?

One strikeout, one batter reaches first, and – boom, Mulholland fields the next hit to line up the double play at second and first. Goodnight, Game 2.

College of Business congratulates all of the Oregon State baseball players, and shares the love for the 15 teammates of 34 that study business. Tyler Malone, who minors in business, served in the Beavs starting lineup as a designated hitter, and made critical homeruns throughout the series. Freshman in business, Zach Clayton, was pinch runner for Zak Taylor in the ninth inning of Game 2, and scored the tying run after the Cadyn Grenier fly-out drama and the base hit that followed.

 

Our Players

Jordan Britton, Zach Clayton, Dakota Donovan, Brandon Eisert, Bryce Fehmel, Grant Gambrell, Michael Gretler, Preston Jones, Steven Kwan, Tyler Malone, Jake Mullholland, Adley Rutschman, Sam Tweedt,  Cade Warren, Zack Zalesky.

 

Check out our Facebook photo album.

College of Business Recognizes Contributions of Tom Dowling

“The year was 1982. Michael Jackson’s now iconic album, Thriller, had just been released. The average cost of a home was $82,000. Gasoline was a mere 91 cents per gallon. This also was the year Tom Dowling began a 36-year career educating students in the OSU College of Business…” begins Daniel Lykins, director of teaching and learning, in his roast to honor retiring instructor Tom Dowling’s three-plus decades of service to the college at the 2018 Celebration of Achievement.

Dowling, who began his career teaching undergraduate courses, has most notably contributed to the college’s MBA program with leadership of the students’ Integrated Business Projects.

Read more of Lykins remarks below:

“The most visible portion of Tom’s career is perhaps his work with our MBA program. In 1992 Tom started a new role in the graduate program as a thesis advisor, and in 2001, was a key contributor to the development and introduction of the Integrated Business Project or the IBP.

“Tom played a large role in our MBA IBP program. One of his peers noted that Tom has a knack for helping struggling teams do a more credible job by the end of the year. His role was more than a teacher – it required diplomacy, coaching, leading.

“The first IBP plan was written for Corvallis’ very own NuScale Power, a successful power technology company, which still maintains a close relationship with OSU.

“Many IBP projects led to successful businesses, including a new malaria medication, the first portable dialysis unit approved by FDA, a medical isotope approved by the NRC, and countless others.

“Since 2001, these partner companies have generated more than a billion dollars in revenue based on the projects completed by our MBA student teams.

“Tom was one of the first recipients of the Betty & Forrest Simmons Graduate Teaching Award. He also received the Byron L. Newton Undergraduate Teaching Award. Additionally, he was awarded not one, but two of those prestigious and highly coveted Bernie Newcomb Awards.

“In these last two decades, Tom has served as thesis advisor to more than 200 MBA student teams, and over the course of his career, taught more than 10,000 students.

“Tom’s colleagues fondly remember him as ‘just-in-time Tom’ — which might explain why he was the last one to arrive tonight.

“Nonetheless, there is no doubt that his efforts over his time at OSU will leave a lasting impact on the quality and reputation of our MBA program, and the future achievements of our graduate students.

“Tom, thank you for your three and half decades of service to this college. We wish you well in your retirement.”

 

——

Tom Dowling earned his bachelor’s degree in international studies from Ohio University, graduating summa cum laude, and in 1978, earned his master’s degree in management from the University of Pittsburgh. 

Shortly after his graduation, Tom founded Dowling Consulting Services, Inc., a firm providing consulting services in strategic analysis, strategic planning, and business plan creation. The firm has served both domestic and international clients, from small organizations to Fortune 100 and 500 firms. Tom also later co-founded American Computer & Electronic Services, an IT services and computer engineering consulting firm in 1981, and founded ACES Medical in 2014. 

Our Hollywood heavy hitters are coming ― the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts welcome you to a bonus appearance from commencement speaker Harley Jessup (BFA ’76) and screenwriter Mike Rich (‘81). Friday, June 15 @ LaSells. Facebook event page.

Commencement speaker Harley Jessup (BFA ’76) and screenwriter Mike Rich (‘81) will discuss their work in a program centered on clips from their most iconic films. Moderated by Peter Betjemann, Director of the School of Writing, Literature, and Film.

Harley Jessup has worked at Pixar Animation Studios since 1996, where his credits as production designer include such films as Coco, Ratatouille, Cars 2, The Good Dinosaur, and Monsters, Inc. Previously at Lucasfilm, Industrial Light and Magic, and Disney, he worked on The Hunt for Red October, James and the Giant Peach, and many other films. He received an Academy Award for Visual Effects for Innerspace in 1988.

Mike Rich broke onto the screenwriting scene in 1998, when his screenplay for Finding Forrester won the prestigious Nicholl Fellowship and became a box-office hit starring Sean Connery, Rob Brown, and Busta Rhymes. Since then, he has become a go-to screenwriter in Hollywood, with credits that include such films as The Rookie, Secretariat, Radio, and Cars 3.

Audience questions will be welcome throughout the program by voice and mobile device.

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts.

Read our feature interview “Words of Wisdom from Master Storyteller Mike Rich

Oregon State University College of Business

Student groups host fashion evening

It was a beautiful but blustery evening – hence, no need for wind machines on this catwalk to add flounce and flair to the fashions as Mother Nature got that detail down.

The rest of the details – and there were many – from a requisite high-volume, heavy-bass sound system, crowds of spectators, and gorgeous models to the inspired clothing collections of burgeoning designers were handled to great success by student groups, the National Retail Federation Student Association and the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists.

“Revolution,” the inaugural fashion event of the newly formed student clubs affiliated with the Merchandising Management and Design & Innovation Management majors at the college, featured the work of talented designers, and tapped into the edgy, global mood of change, sustainability and future uncertainty.

The first part of the show welcomed the talents of student designers from across OSU campus featuring “upcycled” garments constructed from discarded items, e.g., plastic bags, a Swiss military sleeping bag, old denim, fabric found in a dumpster, etc.

The second segment showcased the College of Business’ Apparel Design majors, and featured truly unique to OSU, unique to Oregon inspirations. Where else in the world will you see a wedding dress designed from waterproof material? Go Beavs!

The show, which created a space for each designer’s unique point of view, told a story that encompassed power, equality, and self-worth. Five designers ventured into the dystopian space of upcycled fashion; six submitted a single garment, and apparel design program students created seventeen collections.

The results – bright neon blocks of color, brave necklines, a patchwork of unique details and fabrics, complex paired with comfortable – came together in a long parade of stunning designs.

Bravo, brava, bravi! A great shout out to the designers, models, members of both organizations AATCC and NRFSA, faculty, the Memorial Union and Student Experience Center for their contributions and outstanding performance.

(p.s. Like our Facebook photos!)

CONGRATULATIONS, DESIGNERS!

Upcycled Garments

  • Jordan Farris
  • Amber Hill
  • Xuyang Huang
  • Irina Sergeyeva
  • Payton Smyer

Single Garments

  • Carley Conduff
  • Nicole Goecke
  • Xin Yu Liu
  • Alex Podeschi & Lauren Clay
  • Marie Recine

Collections

  • Katie Alston
  • Cassie Downing
  • Jessica Downing
  • Jordan Farris
  • Amber Hill
  • Leah Jaeger
  • Lauren Johnson
  • Melany Mailangkay
  • Meryl Muckenthaler
  • Hannah Norum
  • Marie Recine (2 collections)
  • Kirklynn Russell
  • Irina Sergeyeva
  • Payton Smyer
  • Alaura Unger
  • Catherine Wong

A streak begins! Oregon State women golfers are back in the Regionals for the second year in a row, hitting a consecutive-years streak for postseason play not matched since 2000-2001, and making another strong statement for second-year head coach Dawn Shockley.

College of Business junior Olivia Benzin, sophomores Nicole Schroeder and Mari Nishiura will represent OSU along with Susie Cavanagh and Ellie Slama at the NCAA Division I tournament.

In total, four women of the seven-member golf squad are studying in the College of Business: Benzin,  Schroeder, Nishiura and Haley Nist, and the group has earned academic accolades for the season in addition to postseason rankings.

Team lauded for highest GPA among women’s athletics

At the May 2018 Academic Achievement Dinner the women’s golf team was honored for holding the highest team GPA among all OSU women’s sports teams. Olivia Benzin earned the highest GPA on the team. Teammates Nist and Schroeder also were recognized for student-athlete achievements.

Congratulations for their hard work in the classroom and on the green!

OSU women’s golf is among the 72 teams competing in the NCAA Division I Regionals at four tournament locations around the nation on May 7-9 at the University Ridge Golf Course in Madison, Wis., hosted by the University of Wisconsin.

The Beavers are seeded 14th of the 18 teams at Madison. Arizona State, the third seed in the Madison regional, is the women’s defending national champion.

Six teams from each regional advance to the championship on May 18-23 at Karsten Creek Golf Club, in Stillwater, Oklahoma, hosted by Oklahoma State University. The Beavers finished seventh last year in Lubbock, Texas, their best-ever finish at NCAA Regionals.

Go Beavs!