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Archive for higher education

11-30-18

By Rick Cooper

When Oregon’s legislative session kicks off in January, a doctoral student in environmental science will be providing lawmakers with information on marine and coastal issues, thanks to funding from Oregon Sea Grant.

As a recipient of Oregon Sea Grant’s 2019 Legislative Fellowship, Valerie Stephan-LeBoeuf will be assigned to the office of Rep. David Brock Smith, the incoming chair of the Coastal Caucus.

Among her duties, she will organize weekly meetings of the Caucus, research legislation that affects marine resources and the Oregon coast, and report on the progress and outcomes of marine and coastal issues addressed during the session.

Science educator Valerie Stephan-LeBoeuf is Oregon Sea Grant's 2019 Legislative Fellow.

Science educator Valerie Stephan-LeBoeuf is Oregon Sea Grant’s 2019 Legislative Fellow. (Photo by Michaela LeBoeuf)

The Idaho native started her fellowship on Nov. 1 and is based in Salem. She plans to continue her studies during the fellowship, which runs through June 30 when the legislative session ends. She is pursuing a doctorate at the University of Idaho, where she is studying restoration efforts for sea otters along the Oregon coast.

“This fellowship opportunity will not only enhance my understanding of the legislative process in Oregon, but will also provide valuable networking opportunities that will enrich my future graduate studies and professional career,” Stephan-LeBoeuf said.

A former zookeeper, Stephan-LeBoeuf also spent 10 years rehabilitating and releasing wildlife, including bears and cougars. She has also worked as an educator and facilitator for human-wildlife conflict resolution, focusing on humane and sustainable solutions to environmental issues. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in paralegal studies from Boise State University, a master’s in education from Concordia University, and a master’s in environmental science from the University of Idaho.

“I am specifically interested in the management of marine mammals, and in the use of methods that integrate collaboration with stakeholders during policy development and review,” Stephan-LeBoeuf said.

“Valerie’s strong interpersonal skills complement her experience with navigating key natural resource issues,” said Sarah Kolesar, the leader of Oregon Sea Grant’s research and scholars program. “Working with coastal lawmakers will provide her additional experience with marine and ocean topics. Her excellent work ethic makes her a valuable asset for the Caucus.”

Each legislative session, Oregon Sea Grant sponsors one Fellow. The goal is not only to help lawmakers but to help the recipient understand the legislative process and develop skills for collaborating with government and other organizations. Fellows receive a competitive monthly stipend. They do not assume a political position or lobby on any issue.

The next application deadline will be in August 2019 (date TBA). Applicants must be enrolled in a master’s, doctorate, or professional degree program (e.g., law school) in any discipline at an institution of higher education with work physically located in Oregon, or have completed their degree after December 2017. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

under: environment, fellowships, higher education, marine animals, marine mammals, marine policy, marine science, news, ocean law and policy, Oregon Sea Grant, people, science education, Sea Grant Scholars
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Oregon Sea Grant funds two OSU students, PSU alumna

Posted by: | September 12, 2018 Comments Off on Oregon Sea Grant funds two OSU students, PSU alumna |
OSU grad student Emily Mazur will be working with NOAA.

OSU grad student Emily Mazur will be working with NOAA on conveying important info to scientists. (Photo by George Mazur)

September 13, 2018

By Rick Cooper

Oregon Sea Grant has awarded $54,000 to two graduate students at Oregon State University and a Portland State University alumna to assist them with their research and environmental management work.

OSU graduate students Emily Mazur and Erin Peck are recipients of the 2018-19 Robert E. Malouf Marine Studies Scholarships, and PSU graduate Bryn Hudson has been awarded a 2018-19 Natural Resource Policy Fellowship.

Mazur completed a bachelor’s degree in marine science and biology at the University of Miami, where she also minored in marine policy. She is working toward a master’s degree in marine resource management at OSU. She will be working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to better understand how agencies can convey important weather, ocean and climate information to Oregon scientists.

OSU doctoral candidate is studying environmental and human factors affecting Oregon's salt marshes.

OSU doctoral candidate Erin Peck is studying environmental and human factors affecting Oregon’s salt marshes. (Photo by Kristina Montville)

Peck earned her bachelor’s degree in environmental science from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and her master’s from OSU’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, where she is working toward a doctorate in ocean ecology and biochemistry. Her research aims to identify the main factors affecting sediment accumulation and carbon burial in Oregon’s salt marshes and to determine the marshes’ resilience to sea-level rise and human-caused land-use changes.

Hudson holds a bachelor’s degree in aquatic biology with a minor in educational studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a master’s degree in environmental science and management from Portland State University. She will work with the Governor’s Natural Resource Office, helping to implement and advance the governor’s natural resource and environmental agenda. In addition, she will assist state departments in managing issues and advancing their budget requests and legislative proposals. The position also involves providing critical support on coastal issues such as water quality, ocean acidification and hypoxia, sea-level rise, marine renewable energy, planning for rocky shores, invasive species and marine fisheries.

PSU grad Bryn Hudson will work with the Governor's Natural Resource Office on a variety of tasks and issues.

PSU grad Bryn Hudson will work with the Governor’s Natural Resource Office on a variety of tasks and issues.

The Malouf Scholarship is awarded to graduate students who combine societally relevant research with education or public engagement. The students may be enrolled at any college or university in Oregon while working toward a degree in any field compatible with Oregon Sea Grant’s strategic plan. The yearlong scholarship is named for Robert E. Malouf, who was the director of Oregon Sea Grant from 1991 until his retirement in 2008. The 2018-19 award is $10,800. The scholarship begins October 1, 2018, and ends September 30, 2019.

The Natural Resource Policy Fellowship, also a year in length, is intended to give a graduate student first-hand, full-time experience in natural resource policy at the state level. In so doing, the student contributes to policies that benefit natural-resource managers, coastal community members, and user groups such as fishermen. The fellowship pays $32,400 for the year, which also begins October 1, 2018, and ends September 30, 2019.

The fellowship and scholarships are all funded and administered by Oregon Sea Grant.

under: awards, climate, climate adaptation, ecology, environment, fellowships, fisheries, fishermen, higher education, marine animals, marine education, marine policy, marine reserves, marine science, marine spatial planning, news, NOAA, ocean acidification, ocean law and policy, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University, scholarships, science education, Sea Grant Scholars, sea level rise, seafood, social science, sustainability, water quality
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Video: Summer internships prepare undergrads for marine science careers

Posted by: | August 24, 2017 Comments Off on Video: Summer internships prepare undergrads for marine science careers |

This new video shows how Oregon Sea Grant’s Summer Scholars program helps prepare high-caliber junior and senior undergraduates from around the U.S. for careers in the marine sciences or the management of coastal resources. The program places students with Oregon-based federal and state agencies and nongovernmental organizations for paid, 10-week internships.

Students are assigned to a specific project under a mentor. They may assist their mentors with field work, lab work, analysis, research, policy development or public engagement efforts.

The video, produced by Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), also highlights some of this summer’s activities and includes interviews with students and mentors.

Ten students from seven different states participated in this year’s program, interning with agencies such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the USDA, the OSU Extension Tourism Program, the EPA and the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve. Students worked on topics ranging from monitoring recovering sea star populations to spreading awareness about marine reserves to testing unmanned aircraft systems’ viability in shellfish surveys.

Students also participated in a professional-development workshop on science communication and outreach and engagement. The workshop was followed by a hiking and camping trip, allowing students both to explore more of Oregon’s scenic beauty and spend some quality time with their cohort.

The program culminated with a symposium that was open to the public. Friends, family, mentors and coworkers came to watch the scholars present on their summer’s work.

“The skills I’ve gained this summer as a scholar seem a little difficult to quantify because it feels like there’s a lot,” student Catie Michel said in the video. “But I’ve especially appreciated learning about successful collaboration with people and effective communication, especially in terms of science and research.”

In addition to aligning with OSG’s vision, mission and values, the goals of the Summer Scholars program are to

  • prepare students for graduate school and/or careers in marine science, policy, management, and outreach through funding support and hands-on experience;
  • support host organization program initiatives and facilitate scholars’ understanding of their work’s importance in accomplishing the broader host organization goals; and
  • promote integration of diverse perspectives into problem solving for coastal Oregon to provide richer and more inclusive solutions.

The program also strives to encourage student success during and after their internships through cultivating an inclusive environment, creating a broad professional network in the marine field, offering professional development opportunities with an emphasis on science communication, and fostering a supportive mentor/mentee relationship.

“What I enjoy about mentoring a Sea Grant scholar is watching the students enjoy the learning experience,” Tommy Swearingen, a researcher with the ODFW, said in the video. “As an agency scientist, it is a huge benefit to our program to have the contribution that students make.”

Oregon Sea Grant Summer Scholars Program was filmed and edited by Haley Epperly.

More information about the Summer Scholars program can be found here.

under: ecology, ecosystem-based-management, environment, Extension, higher education, internships, marine animals, marine education, marine policy, marine reserves, marine science, marine spatial planning, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University, public communication, research, scholarships, science communication, science education, Sea Grant Scholars, summer activities, videos, water quality & conservation, watersheds
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Selina Heppell named to head OSU Fisheries & Wildlife

Posted by: | December 22, 2015 Comments Off on Selina Heppell named to head OSU Fisheries & Wildlife |

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Selina Heppell, an Oregon State University conservation biologist, has been named head of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

She is the first woman to hold that position in the department’s 80-year history.

Heppell succeeds former department head W. Daniel “Dan” Edge, who earlier this year was named associate dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences. A faculty member in fisheries and wildlife since 2001, Heppell has served as associate and interim head of the department.

“Selina has provided terrific leadership during her term as interim head of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and I am delighted that she will continue to lead the department, which is one of the best in the nation,” said Dan Arp, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences. “She is a distinguished researcher and teacher with a demonstrated commitment to excellence.”

Heppell will lead one of the largest natural sciences programs at OSU, with more than 600 registered undergraduate majors in Corvallis and online, 180 graduate students and eight degrees and certificates. There are about 140 (non-student) employees in the department, which brought in about $7.4 million in research grants and contracts in 2015.

Heppell has served as principal investigator on several recent Oregon Sea Grant research projects on topics such as the 2012 invasion of Humboldt squid into Oregon and Washington waters and developing better tools for fisheries stock assessment. She also serves on the science advisory board for a successful coastal citizen science project, the long-term Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST).

Learn more:

under: fisheries, higher education, Oregon State University, people, research

Port Orford Field Station Holds Open House Nov. 14

Posted by: | November 5, 2015 Comments Off on Port Orford Field Station Holds Open House Nov. 14 |

PORT ORFORD – Oregon State University’s two-year-old research field station in Port Orford will hold an open house Nov. 14 to celebrate its expanded role in coastal research, outreach and education.

The open house runs from 3-6 pm at the station, 444 Jackson Street, in Port Orford. It’s free and open to the public; light refreshments will be served.

The field station is supported by numerous programs at OSU that have a role in marine studies, including Oregon Sea Grant, the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station (COMES), the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and the OSU Research Office.

Port Orford Sustainable Seafood, a local fish processor, is also located in the building and its staff will be on-hand during the open house to describe its operation.

“The field station has been a place that professional scientists, students and citizen scientists can use as a base of operation to study topics ranging from the ecology of marine reserves to gray whale foraging behavior,” said Cynthia Sagers, OSU’s vice president for research. “The field station provides two laboratories, classroom and office space, and housing for visiting researchers.”

Station manager Tom Calvanese said that in June, the station installed a SCUBA air fill station to support scientific divers conducting underwater surveys. “Recently, we began to make this service available to recreational divers seeking to explore the rocky reefs in the area – a known diver destination,” he said.

Funding for the facility was launched with a $425,000 allocation by the Oregon Legislature in 2011 to purchase the building. OSU has funded its operation since.

under: citizen science, events, higher education, marine reserves, research

Spring, summer opportunities for undergrad, grad students

Posted by: | January 15, 2015 Comments Off on Spring, summer opportunities for undergrad, grad students |

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified undergraduate and graduate students to take part in working and learning opportunities this spring and summer.

  • Our fifth Summer Scholars program places high caliber undergraduate students from around the country for 10 weeks working with public agencies (federal, state, and local) . Scholars assist host agencies with field work, lab work, analysis, research, policy development, and/or outreach and public engagement efforts around ocean and coastal issues. Each is will be assigned to a specific project under a mentor and expected to dedicate at least 40 hours a week to the program starting on June 15. The application deadline is Feb. 20. Read application details here.
  • The Sea Grant Marine Education program at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport is hiring spring and summer student interns to assist with public and school workshops, classes, and field trips around marine science topics. The positions, open to any qualified undergraduate or graduate student, involve creating and presenting lab and field programs for school, youth and family groups, maintaining education program labs and equipment, and taking part in special projects.
under: higher education, HMSC Visitor Center, internships, position announcements, Sea Grant Scholars

Graduate fellowship deadlines approach

Posted by: | December 17, 2014 Comments Off on Graduate fellowship deadlines approach |

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified applicants for four graduate and postgraduate fellowships in marine science and policy.

The NOAA Coastal Management Fellowship (deadline Friday, January 23, 2015) provides on-the-job education and training opportunities in coastal resource management and policy for postgraduate students while assisting state coastal zone management programs. The program matches postgraduate students with state coastal zone programs to work on projects proposed by the state and selected by the fellowship sponsor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center. This two-year opportunity offers a competitive salary, medical benefits, and travel and relocation expense reimbursement. Any student who will complete a master’s, doctoral, or professional degree program in natural resource management or environmental-related studies at an accredited U.S. university between January 1, 2014, and July 31, 2015, is eligible.

The National Marine Fisheries Service/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Marine Resource Economics (deadline Thursday, January 29, 2015) expects to award at least two new PhD Fellowships starting Aug. 1, 2015 to students who are interested in careers related to marine ecosystem and population dynamics. The Fellowships can provide support for up to three years for highly qualified graduate students working toward a PhD in quantitative ecology, ecosystem ecology, population dynamics or related fields of study. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. Applicants must be United States citizens, and at the time they apply must be admitted to a PhD program in a relevant field of study at a US institution.

The NMFS/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Population and Ecosystem Dynamics (deadline  Thursday, January 29, 2015) generally awards two new PhD Fellowships each year to students who are interested in careers related to the development and implementation of quantitative methods for assessing the economics of the conservation and management of living marine resources. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of NMFS mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. The Fellowship can provide support for up to two years for highly qualified graduate students working towards a Ph.D. in in marine resource economics, natural resource economics, or environmental economics. Applicants admitted to a PhD degree program in resource or environmental economics at a US institution.

Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships (deadline Friday, February 13, 2015)  provides a unique educational experience to students enrolled in graduate programs in fields related to marine or Great Lakes studies. The program matches highly qualified graduate students with hosts in the legislative branch, the executive branch, or appropriate associations and institutions located in the Washington, D.C. area. Recipients spend one year working on substantive national policy issues related to marine issues; a stipend is provided. The Fellowship is open to any student, regardless of citizenship, who is enrolled toward a degree in a graduate or professional program at an accredited US institution.

For all four opportunities, completed applications must be delivered to the Oregon Sea Grant program office in Suite 350 of the University Plaza Building, 15th and Western in Corvallis,  by 5 pm on the deadline date.

Learn more:

 

under: fellowships, higher education, National Sea Grant Program, NOAA

OSG Scholars Day draws students from all backgrounds

Posted by: | November 14, 2014 Comments Off on OSG Scholars Day draws students from all backgrounds |
Sea Grant Scholars Day 2014

Scholars discussed effective communication methods during the morning session. (Photo by Dylan McDowell)

CORVALLIS—A little training, a little fellowship and a chance to show off what they’ve learned: That’s what a gathering of graduate and undergraduate university students got Thursday when they gathered at Oregon State University for the second Oregon Sea Grant Scholars Day.

“This is really an opportunity for students we support to come and tell us about their work, and also get a little bit of training,” said Oregon Sea Grant Director Shelby Walker.

The Sea Grant Scholars program combines Oregon Sea Grant’s fellowship, internship and scholarship offerings under an umbrella that not only gives students opportunities to learn and conduct research and public outreach projects, but also provides them with opportunities to grow as professionals. Scholars Day – which is anticipated to take place every other year – is one such opportunity.

This year, 19 participants spent the morning focusing on understanding the changing roles of  science communicators and strategies for more effectively reaching target audiences. Scholars also spent time framing their “mental models,” or preconceived notions that communicators – and others – hold about specific subjects or groups of people.

“Communication is not so much about you talking to someone, but really about two mental models meeting,” explained Shawn Rowe, director of OSG’s Free Choice Learning program and a specialist in communication theory.

Mental models can become barriers in effective communication. Rowe emphasized the need to understand the mindset of audiences and their viewpoints before trying to communicate. Scholars were given a case study on tsunami debris to practice developing an effective outreach plan that considered the mental model of a specific stakeholder.

After lunch with the Oregon Sea Grant Advisory council and program leaders, scholars were joined by an audience of about 30 who came to hear about their research projects. Presentations covered the economic effect of jellyfish blooms, the influence of climate change in coastal communities, creating age models for burrowing shrimp and more.

Two students also presented on their legislative policy fellowships: Zach Penney, a current Sea Grant  Knauss Fellow, talked about his experiences in Washington, D.C., including his work on legislation about Northern California land exchange that has passed the U.S. House of Representatives. Rose Rimler, a Sea Grant Natural Resources Policy Fellow, discussed her work updating environmental action plans for the Tillamook Estuaries Partnership.

The day culminated in a poster session and reception where the scholars had a chance to discuss their research with peers and audience members.

“It’s a nice way for me to ease back into what science is like after completing law school,” said Emi Kondo, a current Knauss Fellowship finalist through Oregon Sea Grant, following the presentations. “I can really appreciate how people explain the science in way that everyone understands. I’m going into policy and it’s great to learn these skills.”

The year’s event drew current and recent Sea Grant Scholars from OSU, the University of Oregon, Lewis and Clark College, Oregon Health Science University and the University of Idaho.

Learn more:

under: fellowships, higher education, internships, ocean law and policy, Oregon Sea Grant, Sea Grant Scholars

Oregon Sea Grant seeks candidates for program director

Posted by: | August 1, 2013 Comments Off on Oregon Sea Grant seeks candidates for program director |

Oregon Sea Grant invites applications for a full-time (1.00 FTE), 12-month, director position. Reappointment is at the discretion of Oregon State University’s Associate Vice President for Research. The application deadline is Sept. 15, 2013.

Oregon Sea Grant, founded in 1968 and based at OSU, supports research, education and public engagement to help people understand, manage, responsibly interact with and conserve ocean and coastal resources and communities.

Consistently rated one of the top such programs in the country, Oregon Sea Grant is part of a national network of 32 Sea Grant College Programs organized under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This network is a partnership among government, academia, industry, NGOs, and private citizens. Oregon Sea Grant is extremely well connected with local communities and stakeholders, and has made significant contributions in such critical areas as management and science of groundfish and salmon fisheries, pioneering support for wave energy research, programmatic research on free-choice learning, and developing greater public appreciation for and understanding of natural and man-induced coastal hazards. For additional information about Oregon Sea Grant, visit http://seagrant.oregonstate.edu

The program director provides overall leadership for Oregon Sea Grant, oversees a total annual budget of approximately $5M, and manages approximately 48 staff and faculty, who carry out research, administrative, communication and engagement (Extension) functions of exceptional quality and societal impact. He/she leads the organization in articulating and realizing a vision for excellence by embracing collaborative opportunities and fostering alliances. He/she works to encourage creativity and innovation in helping shape the agenda for Sea Grant within the Oregon University System, state, region, and nation The director also represents Oregon Sea Grant and OSU to NOAA’s National Sea Grant Office and the Sea Grant Association, as well as public and private stakeholders within the state and region.Sea Grant is a knowledge based organization, and the Director communicates with state and federal legislators, state and federal policy makers, industry, communities and citizens on 1) economic, environmental, and social implications of the program’s research, and 2) science-based implications of proposed state or federal policy options.

A terminal degree with professional experience and a record of excellence in research/ scholarship, policy, and/or management in marine, coastal, natural resources or a related field are required. Candidates should possess strong listening, writing and speaking skills; a record of innovative leadership and problem solving; and knowledge of marine issues and coastal resources are required. Other requirements include experience managing research programs or large projects, a proven commitment to diversity and team building, and experience working productively with diverse sets of stakeholders. Salary is commensurate with education and experience.

For a complete position description, and to apply, visit jobs. oregonstate.edu

under: higher education, jobs, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University

Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days!

Posted by: | July 15, 2013 Comments Off on Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days! |

Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days this Saturday and Sunday, July 20-21, on Oregon State University’s lower campus in Corvallis, Oregon. Discover interesting biofacts about the diverse life forms found on our beaches; meet some of our undergraduate Summer Scholars and hear about their projects; find out how invasive species impact our aquatic ecosystems; and learn more about Oregon Sea Grant’s integrated research, education, and public engagement on ocean and coastal issues. There is something for everyone at this family-friendly event!

under: environment, events, free-choice learning, higher education, internships, invasive species, marine education, marine science, ocean literacy, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University, outreach and engagement, people, research, science education, Sea Grant Scholars, summer activities

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