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Selina Heppell named to head OSU Fisheries & Wildlife

Posted by: | December 22, 2015 Comments Off on Selina Heppell named to head OSU Fisheries & Wildlife |

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Selina Heppell, an Oregon State University conservation biologist, has been named head of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

She is the first woman to hold that position in the department’s 80-year history.

Heppell succeeds former department head W. Daniel “Dan” Edge, who earlier this year was named associate dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences. A faculty member in fisheries and wildlife since 2001, Heppell has served as associate and interim head of the department.

“Selina has provided terrific leadership during her term as interim head of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and I am delighted that she will continue to lead the department, which is one of the best in the nation,” said Dan Arp, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences. “She is a distinguished researcher and teacher with a demonstrated commitment to excellence.”

Heppell will lead one of the largest natural sciences programs at OSU, with more than 600 registered undergraduate majors in Corvallis and online, 180 graduate students and eight degrees and certificates. There are about 140 (non-student) employees in the department, which brought in about $7.4 million in research grants and contracts in 2015.

Heppell has served as principal investigator on several recent Oregon Sea Grant research projects on topics such as the 2012 invasion of Humboldt squid into Oregon and Washington waters and developing better tools for fisheries stock assessment. She also serves on the science advisory board for a successful coastal citizen science project, the long-term Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST).

Learn more:

under: fisheries, higher education, Oregon State University, people, research

Port Orford Field Station Holds Open House Nov. 14

Posted by: | November 5, 2015 Comments Off on Port Orford Field Station Holds Open House Nov. 14 |

PORT ORFORD – Oregon State University’s two-year-old research field station in Port Orford will hold an open house Nov. 14 to celebrate its expanded role in coastal research, outreach and education.

The open house runs from 3-6 pm at the station, 444 Jackson Street, in Port Orford. It’s free and open to the public; light refreshments will be served.

The field station is supported by numerous programs at OSU that have a role in marine studies, including Oregon Sea Grant, the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station (COMES), the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and the OSU Research Office.

Port Orford Sustainable Seafood, a local fish processor, is also located in the building and its staff will be on-hand during the open house to describe its operation.

“The field station has been a place that professional scientists, students and citizen scientists can use as a base of operation to study topics ranging from the ecology of marine reserves to gray whale foraging behavior,” said Cynthia Sagers, OSU’s vice president for research. “The field station provides two laboratories, classroom and office space, and housing for visiting researchers.”

Station manager Tom Calvanese said that in June, the station installed a SCUBA air fill station to support scientific divers conducting underwater surveys. “Recently, we began to make this service available to recreational divers seeking to explore the rocky reefs in the area – a known diver destination,” he said.

Funding for the facility was launched with a $425,000 allocation by the Oregon Legislature in 2011 to purchase the building. OSU has funded its operation since.

under: citizen science, events, higher education, marine reserves, research

Spring, summer opportunities for undergrad, grad students

Posted by: | January 15, 2015 Comments Off on Spring, summer opportunities for undergrad, grad students |

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified undergraduate and graduate students to take part in working and learning opportunities this spring and summer.

  • Our fifth Summer Scholars program places high caliber undergraduate students from around the country for 10 weeks working with public agencies (federal, state, and local) . Scholars assist host agencies with field work, lab work, analysis, research, policy development, and/or outreach and public engagement efforts around ocean and coastal issues. Each is will be assigned to a specific project under a mentor and expected to dedicate at least 40 hours a week to the program starting on June 15. The application deadline is Feb. 20. Read application details here.
  • The Sea Grant Marine Education program at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport is hiring spring and summer student interns to assist with public and school workshops, classes, and field trips around marine science topics. The positions, open to any qualified undergraduate or graduate student, involve creating and presenting lab and field programs for school, youth and family groups, maintaining education program labs and equipment, and taking part in special projects.
under: higher education, HMSC Visitor Center, internships, position announcements, Sea Grant Scholars

Graduate fellowship deadlines approach

Posted by: | December 17, 2014 Comments Off on Graduate fellowship deadlines approach |

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified applicants for four graduate and postgraduate fellowships in marine science and policy.

The NOAA Coastal Management Fellowship (deadline Friday, January 23, 2015) provides on-the-job education and training opportunities in coastal resource management and policy for postgraduate students while assisting state coastal zone management programs. The program matches postgraduate students with state coastal zone programs to work on projects proposed by the state and selected by the fellowship sponsor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center. This two-year opportunity offers a competitive salary, medical benefits, and travel and relocation expense reimbursement. Any student who will complete a master’s, doctoral, or professional degree program in natural resource management or environmental-related studies at an accredited U.S. university between January 1, 2014, and July 31, 2015, is eligible.

The National Marine Fisheries Service/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Marine Resource Economics (deadline Thursday, January 29, 2015) expects to award at least two new PhD Fellowships starting Aug. 1, 2015 to students who are interested in careers related to marine ecosystem and population dynamics. The Fellowships can provide support for up to three years for highly qualified graduate students working toward a PhD in quantitative ecology, ecosystem ecology, population dynamics or related fields of study. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. Applicants must be United States citizens, and at the time they apply must be admitted to a PhD program in a relevant field of study at a US institution.

The NMFS/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Population and Ecosystem Dynamics (deadline  Thursday, January 29, 2015) generally awards two new PhD Fellowships each year to students who are interested in careers related to the development and implementation of quantitative methods for assessing the economics of the conservation and management of living marine resources. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of NMFS mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. The Fellowship can provide support for up to two years for highly qualified graduate students working towards a Ph.D. in in marine resource economics, natural resource economics, or environmental economics. Applicants admitted to a PhD degree program in resource or environmental economics at a US institution.

Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships (deadline Friday, February 13, 2015)  provides a unique educational experience to students enrolled in graduate programs in fields related to marine or Great Lakes studies. The program matches highly qualified graduate students with hosts in the legislative branch, the executive branch, or appropriate associations and institutions located in the Washington, D.C. area. Recipients spend one year working on substantive national policy issues related to marine issues; a stipend is provided. The Fellowship is open to any student, regardless of citizenship, who is enrolled toward a degree in a graduate or professional program at an accredited US institution.

For all four opportunities, completed applications must be delivered to the Oregon Sea Grant program office in Suite 350 of the University Plaza Building, 15th and Western in Corvallis,  by 5 pm on the deadline date.

Learn more:

 

under: fellowships, higher education, National Sea Grant Program, NOAA

OSG Scholars Day draws students from all backgrounds

Posted by: | November 14, 2014 Comments Off on OSG Scholars Day draws students from all backgrounds |
Sea Grant Scholars Day 2014

Scholars discussed effective communication methods during the morning session. (Photo by Dylan McDowell)

CORVALLIS—A little training, a little fellowship and a chance to show off what they’ve learned: That’s what a gathering of graduate and undergraduate university students got Thursday when they gathered at Oregon State University for the second Oregon Sea Grant Scholars Day.

“This is really an opportunity for students we support to come and tell us about their work, and also get a little bit of training,” said Oregon Sea Grant Director Shelby Walker.

The Sea Grant Scholars program combines Oregon Sea Grant’s fellowship, internship and scholarship offerings under an umbrella that not only gives students opportunities to learn and conduct research and public outreach projects, but also provides them with opportunities to grow as professionals. Scholars Day – which is anticipated to take place every other year – is one such opportunity.

This year, 19 participants spent the morning focusing on understanding the changing roles of  science communicators and strategies for more effectively reaching target audiences. Scholars also spent time framing their “mental models,” or preconceived notions that communicators – and others – hold about specific subjects or groups of people.

“Communication is not so much about you talking to someone, but really about two mental models meeting,” explained Shawn Rowe, director of OSG’s Free Choice Learning program and a specialist in communication theory.

Mental models can become barriers in effective communication. Rowe emphasized the need to understand the mindset of audiences and their viewpoints before trying to communicate. Scholars were given a case study on tsunami debris to practice developing an effective outreach plan that considered the mental model of a specific stakeholder.

After lunch with the Oregon Sea Grant Advisory council and program leaders, scholars were joined by an audience of about 30 who came to hear about their research projects. Presentations covered the economic effect of jellyfish blooms, the influence of climate change in coastal communities, creating age models for burrowing shrimp and more.

Two students also presented on their legislative policy fellowships: Zach Penney, a current Sea Grant  Knauss Fellow, talked about his experiences in Washington, D.C., including his work on legislation about Northern California land exchange that has passed the U.S. House of Representatives. Rose Rimler, a Sea Grant Natural Resources Policy Fellow, discussed her work updating environmental action plans for the Tillamook Estuaries Partnership.

The day culminated in a poster session and reception where the scholars had a chance to discuss their research with peers and audience members.

“It’s a nice way for me to ease back into what science is like after completing law school,” said Emi Kondo, a current Knauss Fellowship finalist through Oregon Sea Grant, following the presentations. “I can really appreciate how people explain the science in way that everyone understands. I’m going into policy and it’s great to learn these skills.”

The year’s event drew current and recent Sea Grant Scholars from OSU, the University of Oregon, Lewis and Clark College, Oregon Health Science University and the University of Idaho.

Learn more:

under: fellowships, higher education, internships, ocean law and policy, Oregon Sea Grant, Sea Grant Scholars

Oregon Sea Grant seeks candidates for program director

Posted by: | August 1, 2013 Comments Off on Oregon Sea Grant seeks candidates for program director |

Oregon Sea Grant invites applications for a full-time (1.00 FTE), 12-month, director position. Reappointment is at the discretion of Oregon State University’s Associate Vice President for Research. The application deadline is Sept. 15, 2013.

Oregon Sea Grant, founded in 1968 and based at OSU, supports research, education and public engagement to help people understand, manage, responsibly interact with and conserve ocean and coastal resources and communities.

Consistently rated one of the top such programs in the country, Oregon Sea Grant is part of a national network of 32 Sea Grant College Programs organized under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This network is a partnership among government, academia, industry, NGOs, and private citizens. Oregon Sea Grant is extremely well connected with local communities and stakeholders, and has made significant contributions in such critical areas as management and science of groundfish and salmon fisheries, pioneering support for wave energy research, programmatic research on free-choice learning, and developing greater public appreciation for and understanding of natural and man-induced coastal hazards. For additional information about Oregon Sea Grant, visit http://seagrant.oregonstate.edu

The program director provides overall leadership for Oregon Sea Grant, oversees a total annual budget of approximately $5M, and manages approximately 48 staff and faculty, who carry out research, administrative, communication and engagement (Extension) functions of exceptional quality and societal impact. He/she leads the organization in articulating and realizing a vision for excellence by embracing collaborative opportunities and fostering alliances. He/she works to encourage creativity and innovation in helping shape the agenda for Sea Grant within the Oregon University System, state, region, and nation The director also represents Oregon Sea Grant and OSU to NOAA’s National Sea Grant Office and the Sea Grant Association, as well as public and private stakeholders within the state and region.Sea Grant is a knowledge based organization, and the Director communicates with state and federal legislators, state and federal policy makers, industry, communities and citizens on 1) economic, environmental, and social implications of the program’s research, and 2) science-based implications of proposed state or federal policy options.

A terminal degree with professional experience and a record of excellence in research/ scholarship, policy, and/or management in marine, coastal, natural resources or a related field are required. Candidates should possess strong listening, writing and speaking skills; a record of innovative leadership and problem solving; and knowledge of marine issues and coastal resources are required. Other requirements include experience managing research programs or large projects, a proven commitment to diversity and team building, and experience working productively with diverse sets of stakeholders. Salary is commensurate with education and experience.

For a complete position description, and to apply, visit jobs. oregonstate.edu

under: higher education, jobs, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University

Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days!

Posted by: | July 15, 2013 Comments Off on Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days! |

Join Oregon Sea Grant at da Vinci Days this Saturday and Sunday, July 20-21, on Oregon State University’s lower campus in Corvallis, Oregon. Discover interesting biofacts about the diverse life forms found on our beaches; meet some of our undergraduate Summer Scholars and hear about their projects; find out how invasive species impact our aquatic ecosystems; and learn more about Oregon Sea Grant’s integrated research, education, and public engagement on ocean and coastal issues. There is something for everyone at this family-friendly event!

under: environment, events, free-choice learning, higher education, internships, invasive species, marine education, marine science, ocean literacy, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University, outreach and engagement, people, research, science education, Sea Grant Scholars, summer activities

Markham symposium highlights work of HMSC graduate researchers

Posted by: | June 12, 2013 Comments Off on Markham symposium highlights work of HMSC graduate researchers |

Hatfield Marine Science CenterNEWPORT – The 19th annual Markham Symposium, a celebration of graduate student research and scholarship, will be held at the Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  in Newport on June 19. This year’s symposium will feature student research presentations in an exciting, fast-paced format.  Poster presentations and an informal reception will give attendees a chance to meet students and their mentors. The event, from 10 am-12:30 pm in the Visitor Center auditorium, is free and open to the public.

Read more about the Symposium in Currents, the HMSC newsletter – now available via RSS feed – and while you’re at it, check out the redesigned HMSC Website.

The  HMSC is celebrating its 47th year as a leading marine laboratory distinguished by its many collaborative research partnerships. Originally established as a marine laboratory for OSU, the center currently hosts research and education programs from seven OSU colleges and six state and federal agencies on a 49-acre campus. on the south shore of Yaquina Bay. The facility is also home to the HMSC Visitor Center, managed by Oregon Sea Grant as a public and K-12 education facility and a social laboratory for OSU’s  Free-Choice Learning Lab.

under: events, higher education, marine education, marine science, research, symposium

TERRA: Scientists and Engineers Plan for the Big One

Posted by: | June 4, 2013 Comments Off on TERRA: Scientists and Engineers Plan for the Big One |

Terra Magazine cover“The last great earthquake to strike the Pacific Northwest occurred on January 26, 1700, at about 9 p.m. Parts of the coastline dropped three to six feet in an instant. It set off landslides throughout the Oregon Coast Range. Some of them are still moving. If you could hear soil, rocks and trees creep inch-by-inch downhill, some of those sounds would echo that massive jolt. At sea, it generated tsunamis that reshaped the Northwest coastline, traveled across the Pacific and swept through bays and coastal communities in Japan. …”

The latest issue of Terra, Oregon State University’s research magazine, delves into the ways in which OSU scientists and engineers are helping the state prepare for the next big Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake, which a growing number of researchers calculate could happen within the next 50-100 years. Learn how such a powerful near-short “megathrust” quake could affect the state and region, and what’s being done to plan for, and mitigate against, such disasters.

The spring edition also looks at how people like Oregon Sea Grant’s Tim Miller-Morgan care for the fish and other aquatic animals that make up more than 80 percent of the animals used in the university’s research labs and the public exhibits at the Hatfield Marine Science Center. The past few decades have witnessed great changes in how institutions like OSU treat the animals in their care; as Miller-Morgan puts it, ““Now we understand that we shouldn’t look at these animals as disposable. We brought them into captivity, and we have an obligation to keep them as long as we can, as close to their natural lifespan as possible — or even longer.”

Learn More

under: coastal hazards, earthquake, higher education, HMSC Visitor Center, marine animals, Oregon State University, outreach and engagement, research

Register now for the Free-Choice Learning Professional Certificate

Posted by: | March 4, 2013 Comments Off on Register now for the Free-Choice Learning Professional Certificate |

Registration is now open for the Free-Choice Learning Professional Certificate, an online program offered by Oregon State University.

The program helps museum, zoo, aquarium, and science outreach professionals and volunteers discover more about free-choice learning, the study of what, where, and how we choose to learn over the course of our lifetimes.

Courses are taught by experienced Oregon State faculty and researchers Lynn Dierking, Sea Grant professor and interim associate dean for research in the OSU College of Education; John H. Falk, Sea Grant professor and interim director of the Center for Research in Lifelong STEM Learning; Shawn Rowe, marine education and learning specialist at Oregon Sea Grant Extension; and Jennifer Bachman, instructor and Free-Choice Learning program coordinator.

To learn more about this and other OSU Professional and Noncredit Education certificate programs, visit https://pne.oregonstate.edu/certificates.

under: courses, classes and workshops, free-choice learning, higher education, Oregon Sea Grant, outreach and engagement

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