Animal Bioacoustics

Technology. Ecology. Noise

Animal Bioacoustics

Tag archives for Oregon Coast

Miracle (2015): A lesson in waiting. And teamwork.

I feel like I experienced a miracle last week. Possibly I am throwing around the word “miracle” because I’ve got Herb Brooks on my mind (thanks to my fellow grad student and FW intramural soccer coach Matt who is obsessed with that guy). Or perhaps that is actually what happened. Let me set the stage. Will […]

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Inversion Layer

Well, I took last month off from blogging because I didn’t have much exciting to share. Then my turn came up again this month and again I realized I don’t have much to share. So I decided to go with it and just ramble for a bit. I have been working on wrapping up my […]

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No excitement November?

Greetings extensive readership! In the midst of the summer and early fall when I was traveling a bunch and doing field work, I remember thinking how nice the term would be to be in one place for a while and get some analysis/other work done. What I didn’t realize was how unexciting my life would […]

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Talk about the weather

Oscar Wilde said that “Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” Sorry Oscar, despite my deep respect and admiration to you I will have to object this one. Talking about the weather is lame; I seriously thought before. But I have changed my mind, since I moved to the Oregon Coast. […]

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First Successful DMON Deployment!

Last Thursday marked our labs first successful DMON (Digital Acoustic Monitor) deployment of the spring! The DMON is a passive acoustic instrument that is capable of recording and processing audio in real-time. Friday, May 16th, a single DMON was deployed off the coast of central Oregon to target the acoustic signatures and monitor the occurrence […]

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Staying Afloat

It’s springtime here on the Oregon Coast.  The white-crowned sparrows are singing at the Hatfield Marine Science Center,  the seagulls are growing audacious at the sight of beach picnics and barbecues, and on top of our normal research load here at the ORCAA lab (bowhead whales, how I love thee singing on my computer screen), […]

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