Animal Bioacoustics

Technology. Ecology. Noise

Animal Bioacoustics

Tag archives for fun

I should have known

…that I would grow up to be a pseudo computer nerd doing stuff related to animals. (sarcasm…) I was recently reminded of the online game Neopets*. Anyone out there remember this game? Mom – do you remember me playing it? It was sort of like a computer based Tomogatchi and Pokemon hybrid. You had pets, […]

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Remembering Why

Last week I got to spend a week offshore, participating in the last field season (what?!) of the SOCAL-BRS project. This was a bittersweet week, to say the least. I’ve been involved with this project since before I even started grad school (see here and here for my blogs on it the last two years). It’s a […]

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Soundbites for the week of Oct. 5 – 9

Soundbites is your weekly dose of the newest, coolest bioacoustics news, plus other fun stuff, all in bite-size form. A day late and a dollar short this week, folks. Blame my thesis… Guys, I haven’t got a lot of new bioacoustics news for you this week. I got a great Google alert about a paper called […]

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Call me Jonesy

Wow! Summer winded down quickly. It felt like a lot of time spent writing, some exciting and stressful glider piloting, and I wrapped it up with 2 weeks on the water in Southern California working on the SOCAL BRS project. (You can read a public summary of the project here). I’ve talked about this project […]

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Soundbites for the week of Sept 28 – Oct 2

What’s that, you say? Has Soundbites returned? Indeed it has! After a long hiatus for the summer, Soundbites is returning this term to provide you with all the latest and greatest bioacoustics news, bite-sized!  Phantom road experiment reveals noise degrades habitat: man do I like this experiment. As all of the ORCAA students could tell you, […]

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Soundbites for the week of May 11 – 15

Soundbites is a biweekly feature of the coolest, newest bioacoustics, soundscape, and acoustic research, in bite-size form. Plus other cool stuff having to do with sound.  Multimodal signalling in redwing blackbirds in noisy situations: more bird stuff this week to start off. Redwing blackbirds attract mates both acoustically (with songs) and visually (by showing off their […]

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Soundbites for the week of April 27 – May 1

Soundbites is a weekly (biweekly, mostly) feature of the coolest, newest bioacoustics, soundscape, and acoustic research, in bite-size form. Plus other cool stuff having to do with sound.  Acoustic “sonic net” may deter invasive European starling communication: noise isn’t all bad. Sometimes it allows us to get rid of things we don’t want, like invasive species. […]

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Soundbites for the week of April 13 – 17

Soundbites is a weekly (biweekly, mostly) feature of the coolest, newest bioacoustics, soundscape, and acoustic research, in bite-size form. Plus other cool stuff having to do with sound.  Bioacoustics helps find what may be a new beaked whale species: this one was hard to miss this week, as it was all over the pop press news […]

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A mighty voice

I came across an interesting video clip today unpacking the anatomy of sound production in Neanderthals. Generally we think of Neanderthals as having low-pitched ‘grunt’ like voices (at least this is how the media/film portrays them); as it turns out this may be a misrepresentation of the Neanderthal voice. Watch the short clip below to […]

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Soundbites for the week of March 30 – April 3

Soundbites is a weekly (less often when Danielle is doing fieldwork) feature of the coolest, newest bioacoustics, soundscape, and acoustic research, in bite-size form. Plus other cool stuff having to do with sound. No April Foolin’ here, just cool research (because Danielle hates April Fools. Seriously.). Grasshoppers have trouble localizing mates in noisy conditions: another tale in […]

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