A Marine Educator At Sea

Sea Grant's Bill Hanshumaker chronicles ocean research missions

A Marine Educator At Sea

Entries Tagged as 'seismometers'

Cascadia Initiative on the RV Oceanus – 2013

April 9th, 2014 · No Comments · 2013 - R/V Oceanus, Recovery, SIO, video

Poor Internet connections prevented Bill from live-blogging the 2013 cruise, though he was able to capture some video (below) that provides an idea of what working conditions can be like at sea. You can learn about the season’s objectives and accomplishments on the Cascadia Initiative 2013 Cruise page. Videos from the 2013 cruise: Bird’s eye […]

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Deepest Recovery

July 16th, 2012 · No Comments · 2012 - R/V New Horizon, Instrumentation, Missions, Procedures, Recovery, Seismometers, SIO

Monday, July 16, 2012 The weather today cooperated with the successful recovery of three of our deepest deployed Abalone seismometers. The seas were calm, with 3 to 6 foot swells. The wind was out of the north, picking up to 11 knots as evening approached. The depth of the seismometers’ deployment directly effects their recovery […]

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Tossed at Sea

July 15th, 2012 · 2 Comments · 2012 - R/V New Horizon, Recovery, Seismometers, weather

Sunday, July 15, 2012 It’s been another full day. We recovered the Abalone seismometer J65 slightly after midnight (00:10) from 165 meters of water. After moving north, the weather deteriorated. Offshore the Washington side of the Juan de Fuca strait the winds rose to more than 35 knots, coming in from the Northwest. The seas […]

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Recovery Locations

July 15th, 2012 · No Comments · 2012 Crew, Recovery

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Heading north on Saturday

July 14th, 2012 · 2 Comments · 2012 - R/V New Horizon, Recovery, Seismometers

Saturday, July 14, 2012 Today we recovered three Abalone seismometers. The first one was Y1M5 (see chart for location) at 07:30 from 828 meters down. The second seismometer (J57) was much shallower. At only 56 meters deep, its structure was covered with barnacles, anemones and a couple of sea stars. The next seismometer (Y1M4) was […]

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Friday the 13th – First night at sea

July 13th, 2012 · No Comments · 2012 - R/V New Horizon, Recovery, Seismometers

The fifteen instruments to be recovered were some of those that were deployed from the October voyage of the Wecoma. These are the Scripps Institute of Oceanography “Abalones”. Abalones are trawl-resistant, three component, battery powered ocean bottom seismometers, capable of being deployed in water depths of 50 to 6000 meters. We are recovering them via […]

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A Day in Transit

October 20th, 2011 · No Comments · 2011 - R/V Wecoma, 2011 Crew, Deployment, Seismometers

Following the continental margin, the Wecoma cruised south at about 10 knots for most of the day. The seas picked up slightly, and there were light scattered showers. We deployed another Abalone seismometer at 4:30, and it was on the bottom by 5:30. We will be deploying the last Cascadia seismometer at 1: am.

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Thursday Morning

October 20th, 2011 · No Comments · 2011 - R/V Wecoma, Deployment, Seismometers

The seas are very calm this morning, making for an easy deployment of the Abalone seismometer. We are directly offshore from the mouth of the Columbia River, in a depth of 2678 meters.

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Off the coast of Washington

October 19th, 2011 · No Comments · 2011 - R/V Wecoma, Deployment, Missions, Seismometers

Wednesday afternoon, October 19th – Off the coast of Washington at the edge of the continental margin We just deployed another Cascadia seismometer. It will take 65 minutes to reach the ocean floor, 2630 meters below. It will take another hour to conduct the acoustic survey, as the Wecoma cruises in a kilometer and ½ […]

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Wednesday’s Sunrise

October 19th, 2011 · No Comments · 2011 - R/V Wecoma, Deployment, Seismometers

The weather has deteriorated somewhat, but is still serviceable.  We deployed two seismometer last night and another one this morning. Since we are in deeper water, it takes longer for the seismometer to reach the bottom.  A acoustic survey is immediately conducted to determine its exact location in three dimensions; latitude, longitude and depth. The […]

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