Africa Project: Kenya & Uganda

Auburn University

Africa Project: Kenya & Uganda

Title: Aquaculture Development in Kenya and Uganda: Advancing Cost-effective Technology, Market Assessment, and End-user Engagement

Theme: Income Generation for Small-Scale Fish Farmers and Fishers

Lead US University: Auburn University

Host Country & Partner Institutions:
US: University of Arizona, Alabama A&M University, North Carolina State University
Kenya: University of Eldoret, Kenyatta University
Uganda: Makerere University, National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI)

Current Research (2016-2018):

Poor families in developing countries typically spend 50 to 70 percent of their income on food. When quality food becomes too expensive, women tend to modify their consumption,often turning to cheaper alternatives, typically lacking in necessary nutrients. To increase income and reduce the prevalence of undernutrition, enhancing access to fish and sustainable aquaculture is key. This project will build on previous work by AquaFish researchers to address obstacles to the development and growth of aquaculture in Uganda and Kenya. Researchers will develop low-cost captive breeding and hatching technologies of African lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus and P. amphibius) that will introduce new opportunities for farming popular native species that are less vulnerable to a changing climate than many non-native species. To increase incomes for fish farmers and improve (and expand) markets of farmed fish, researchers will assess price volatility in the fish supply chain in Uganda, in addition to creating a cell-phone network that will connect people throughout the aquaculture value chain. With the hope of mitigating negative environmental impacts of aquaculture, researchers will measure various metrics of water quality in farmed waterbodies and evaluate the need for water quality amendments. Beyond direct improvements to aquaculture in Kenya and Uganda, researchers plan to train and support women in aquaculture. With the help of institutional partners and industry, researchers will hold a series of capstone events that will train women on the nutritional value of new species and augment women’s access to information about the entire value chain of aquaculture.

  • Development of Low-Cost Captive Breeding and Hatching Technologies for the African Lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus and P. amphibius) (16IND03AU) – Work Plan
  • Implementing and assessing cell-based technical and marketing support systems for small and medium-scale fish farmers in Uganda (16FSV02AU) – Work Plan
  • Assessment of price volatility in the fish supply chain in Uganda (16MER02AU) – Work Plan
  • Women in Uganda aquaculture: training, organization, and advancement (16HHI04AU) – Work Plan
  • Water, water quality, and pond bottom soil management in Ugandan aquaculture (16BMA05AU) – Work Plan

Continuing work:

  • Assessment of Growth Performance of Monosex Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Cages Using Low-Cost, Locally Produced Supplemental Feeds in Cages and Training Fish Farmers on BMPs in Kenya (13SFT06AU) – Work Plan
  • Development of Low-Cost Aquaponics Systems for Kenya (13BMA05AU) – Work Plan

Research (2013-2015):

This project builds on previous work by AquaFish researchers and addresses obstacles to the development and growth of aquaculture in Uganda and Kenya. Whether it be the reproductive control and managed grow out of a new species such as lungfish, the established practice of tilapia culture under diverse and changing local circumstances, or new insights on how to reach and engage fish farmers with practical information through their cellphones, this project focuses on practical, tangible results.

Development of low-cost captive breeding and hatching technologies of African lungfish will introduce new opportunities for farming a popular native species, which is less vulnerable to a changing climate than many non-native species. Training, research, and outreach focused on growing a spatially balanced distribution of seedstock producer clusters will foster the development of the tilapia industry. Readily available, high quality fingerlings will facilitate producer motivation for timely restocking to increase production and enhance availability of supply. The creation of a cellphone network connecting seedstock producers and farmers, and farmers and retailers will improve incomes and market opportunities. Improvements to feed formulation will help address the current burden of high costs of fish feeds that hinder production and expansion of aquaculture in both countries. The introduction of aquaponics, or combined fish and food production, holds promise for new opportunities for food and income production.

  • Development of Low-Cost Captive Breeding and Hatching Technologies for the African Lung Fish species (Protopterus aethiopicus and P. amphibius) to Improve Livelihoods, Nutrition, and Income for Vulnerable Communities in Uganda – 13IND03AU (Final Report)
  • New Approaches to Inform, Motivate, and Advance Small and Medium-scale Fish Farmers: Building Industry Networks through Cell Phone Networks, Training, and Market Participation – 13BMA04AU (Final Report)
  • Assesement of Market Opportunities for Small-Scale Fishers and Farmers in Central Uganda – 13MER05AU (Final Report)
  • Assessment of Growth Performance of Monosex Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Cages Using Low-Cost, Locally Produced Supplemental Feeds in Cages and Training Fish Farmers on BMPs in Kenya – 13SFT06AU
  • Formulation and Manufacture of Practical Feeds for Western Kenya – 13SFT07AU (Final Report)
  • Development of Low-Cost Aquaponics Systems for Kenya – 13BMA05AU

 

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