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Archive for Workshops

Communicating ideas and information from and to humans is a very important subject. In our daily life, human interact with variety of entities, such as, other humans, machines, and media. Constructive interactions are needed for good communication, which would result in successful outcomes, such as answering a query, learning a new skill, getting a service done, and communicating emotions. Each of these entities invokes a set of signals. Current research has focused on analyzing one entity’s signals with no respect to the other entities in a unidirectional manner. The computer vision community focused on detection, classification and recognition of humans and their poses and gestures progressing onto actions, activities, and events but it does not go beyond that. The signal processing community focused on emotion recognition from facial expressions or audio or both combined. The HCI community focused on making easier interfaces for machines to ease their usage. The goal of this workshop is to bring multiple disciplines together, to process human directed signals holistically, in a bidirectional manner, rather than isolation. This workshop is positioned to display this rich domain of applications, which will provide the necessary next boost for these technologies. At the same time, it seeks to ground computational models on theory that would help achieve the technology goals. This would allow us to leverage decades of research in different fields and to spur interdisciplinary research thereby opening up new problem domains for the multimedia community.  Call for papers

Organized by:

Dr. Mohamed R. Amer (SRI International)
Dr. Ajay Divakaran (SRI International)
Prof. Shih-Fu Chang (Colombia University)
Prof. Nicu Sebe (University of Trento)

under: Workshops

Humans form a multitude of social groups through their life and regularly interact with other humans in these groups producing social behavior. Social behavior is behavior that is socially relevant or is situated in an identifiable social context. Interacting or observant humans sense, interpret and understand these behaviors mostly using aural and visual sensory stimuli. Most previous research has focused on detection, classification and recognition of humans and their poses progressing onto actions, activities and events but it mostly lacks grounding in socially relevant contexts. Moreover, this research is largely driven by applications in security & surveillance or in search & retrieval. The time is ripe to ground these technologies in richer social contexts and milieus. This workshop is positioned to show case this rich domain of applications, which will provide the necessary next boost for these technologies. At the same time, it seeks to ground computational models of social behavior in the sociopsychological and neuroscientific theories of human action and behavior. This would allow us to leverage decades of research in these theoretically and empirically rich fields and to spur interdisciplinary research thereby opening up new problem domains for the vision community. Call For Papers

Organized by:

Ajay Divakaran (SRI International)
Maneesh Singh (SRI International)
Mohamed R. Amer (Oregon State University)
Behjat Siddiquie (SRI International)
Saad Khan (SRI International)

under: Workshops

1st Workshop on Understanding Human Activities: Context and Interactions (ICCV2013)

Activity recognition is one of the core problems in computer vision. Recently it has attracted the attention of many researchers in the field. It is significant to many vision related applications such as surveillance, video search, human-computer interaction, and human-human, or social, interactions. Recent advances in feature representations, modeling, and inference techniques led to a significant progress in the field.

Motivated by the rich and complex temporal, spatial, and social structure of human activities, activity recognition today features several new challenges, including modeling group activities, complex temporal reasoning, activity hierarchies, human-object interactions and human-scene interactions. These new challenges aim to answer questions regarding the semantic understanding and high-level reasoning of image and video content. At this level, other classical problems in computer vision, like object detection and tracking, not only impact, but are often intertwined with activity recognition. This inherent complexity prompts more time and thought to be spent on developing solutions to tackle auxiliary problems to the human activity recognition problem. Call for papers

Organized by:

Sameh Khamis (University of Maryland)
Mohamed R. Amer (Oregon State University)
Wongun Choi (NEC-Labs)
Tian Lan (Stanford University)

under: Workshops

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